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2021 April PAD Challenge: Day 9

Write a poem every day of April with the 2021 April Poem-A-Day Challenge. For today's prompt, write a persona poem (for an inanimate object).

TGIF! But be sure to keep poeming through the weekend.

(Click here to check out all the 2021 April prompts.)

For today's prompt, write a persona poem for an inanimate object. A persona poem is when you write a poem in the voice of someone (or in this case something) else. So write a poem in the voice of a pair of scissors, a picture frame, smart phone, or some other inanimate object.

Remember: These prompts are springboards to creativity. Use them to expand your possibilities, not limit them.

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smash poetry journal robert lee brewer

Poem your days away with Robert Lee Brewer's Smash Poetry Journal. This fun poetic guide is loaded with 125 poetry prompts, space to place your poems, and plenty of fun poetic asides.

IndieBound | Amazon

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Here’s my attempt at a Persona Poem:

"stone"

i'm no pebble
but i'm sure not a boulder
sometimes hotter
but others colder to the touch
just pick me up
& you'll see i can break a window
or go skipping
across the skin of a pond
break the surface
& submerge myself forever
ever alone
always ever your stone

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