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2021 April PAD Challenge: Day 30

Write a poem every day of April with the 2021 April Poem-A-Day Challenge. For today's prompt, write a goodbye poem.

Yay! We did it! Final prompt and poem of the month! I hope you'll continue to bounce around on here beyond April, but for now, it's time for our final poem of this challenge. (Oh yeah, and stop the presses! Click here to learn the results of the 2020 November PAD Chapbook Challenge!)

(Click here to check out all the 2021 April prompts.)

For today's prompt, write a goodbye poem. Whether leaving for a holiday or going to get groceries, many people find themselves in positions of saying goodbye to each other. So this feels like an appropriate way to close out this year's challenge...until we meet again.

Remember: These prompts are springboards to creativity. Use them to expand your possibilities, not limit them.

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smash poetry journal robert lee brewer

Poem your days away with Robert Lee Brewer's Smash Poetry Journal. This fun poetic guide is loaded with 125 poetry prompts, space to place your poems, and plenty of fun poetic asides.

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Here’s my attempt at a Goodbye Poem:

"no goodbyes"

this morning
he's not talking
to the birds

they flew away
without warning
or goodbyes

but he knows
they will return
they always do

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Poetry Prompt

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