Shook vs. Shaked vs. Shaken (Grammar Rules)

Learn when to use shook vs. shaked vs. shaken on with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.
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This week, let's look at the differences of shook, shaked, and shaken. Two of the words are past tense for the verb shake, and the other one is not a word at all.

(Grammar rules for writers.)

So let's shake out the meanings.

shook_vs_shaked_vs_shaken_grammar_rules_robert_lee_brewer

Shook vs. Shaked vs. Shaken

Shook is the standard past tense form of the verb "shake." If I shake someone's hand today, then I shook someone's hand yesterday, okay?

Shaked is not a word. If you hear someone use "shaked," he or she probably means to use "shook."

Shaken is the standard past participle of the verb "shake." If I shook his hand yesterday, then his hand was shaken yesterday.

Make sense?

Here are a few examples:

Correct: She shook the bag until the ingredients were mixed.
Incorrect: She shaked the bag until the ingredients were mixed.
Incorrect: She shaken the bag until the ingredients were mixed.

Correct: He had shaken the tree to see if anything would fall out.
Incorrect: He had shook the tree to see if anything would fall out.
Incorrect: He had shaked the tree to see if anything would fall out.

So that's how these three terms shake out. Just remember that shook is active, shaken is passive, and shaked doesn't exist.

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Grammar and Mechanics

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