Winners of the 2008 WD Poetry Awards

Lee Tupman’s “The Forest of Lost Husbands” took first place in WD’s 3rd Annual Poetry Awards competition, taking home $500 in prize money. The online contest, which pulled in nearly 3,800 entries, was open to poems of any style that were original, unpublished and 32 lines or fewer. by Brian A. Klems
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Lee Tupman’s “The Forest of Lost Husbands” took first place in WD’s 3rd Annual Poetry Awards competition, taking home $500 in prize money. The online contest, which pulled in nearly 3,800 entries, was open to poems of any style that were original, unpublished and 32 lines or fewer.

The top 10 received cash prizes, while 11th through 25th place received gift certificates for Writer’s Digest Books. All winners also received the 2008 Poet’s Market.

Click here to read "The Forest of Lost Husbands."

THE TOP 25 WINNERS

1 “The Forest of Lost Husbands” by Lee Tupman
2 “20 Minutes In The Renaissance Gallery” by Ruth Kibler Peck
3 “Haiku ‘In Army fatigues’” by James Hausman
4 “Why Edward Hopper Won’t Paint My Kitchen” by Amy Dengler
5 “Talking With Stanley Kunitz” by Juanita Torrence-Thompson
6 “Photograph of the Year” by Barb McMakin
7 “A Library Died” by Brian Trent
8 “Efflorescence” by Darren Miller
9 “The Visit” by Marc Isaac Potter
10 “Five Tankas” by Christopher Kuhl
11 “Hickory Shad” by Kathryn Reshetiloff
12 “January Rebellion” by Terry Mominee
13 “Monks” by Marc Isaac Potter
14 “Weddings” by Nina Soifer
15 “Vermont’s Three Novembers” by Bruce Graham
16 “Praising the Green Beans” by Ann Malaspina
17 “An Astronomer Drives His Wife Home” by Will Hiltz
18 “Just South Of Epinal” by Ken Kibler
19 “Breakfast in Bangkok” by Teri Holtzclaw
20 “Skipping Stones at Wounded Knee Creek” by Noble Collins
21 “Drive to St. John’s” by Marianne Jones
22 “Savages” by John Shuck
23 “The Mourning Path (St Louis Cemetery #2)” by Craig Mahler
24 “Nexus” by Lisa Romano Licht
25 “Villanelle for Dad and Al Capone” by Gayle Hall-Christensen

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