Plot Twist Story Prompts: Without a Trace

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have a character leave without a trace.
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Plot twist story prompts aren't meant for the beginning or the end of stories. Rather, they're for forcing big and small turns in the anticipated trajectory of a story. This is to make it more interesting for the readers and writers alike.

Each week, I'll provide a new prompt to help twist your story. Find last week's prompt, Fight or Flight, here.

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Plot Twist Story Prompts: Without a Trace

For today's prompt, have a character leave without a trace. The departure may have been a long time coming. Maybe they were threatening to leave for a while and finally screwed up the courage to take off. Or perhaps, it was something completely unexpected.

In fact, leaving without a trace could be voluntary, but it could also be under suspicious circumstances. Was the character hit by a train? Murdered by a hitchhiker? Eaten by a monster? Kidnapped? These are all nefarious possibilities.

(5 moral dilemmas that make characters and stories better.)

Of course, the character may have just wandered off out of boredom. Or to test their independence. A character could be responding to a challenge that nobody else knows exists. There's a chance he or she fell in love with a mysterious stranger and went on a romantic adventure.

Regardless of why or under what circumstances, the character who leaves without a trace leaves behind consequences for the characters who remain. What do they do (if anything) when the character leaves? In what new directions will the story and the characters bend?

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