10 Walt Whitman Quotes for Writers and About Writing

Here are 10 Walt Whitman quotes for writers and about writing from the author of Leaves of Grass. In these quotes, Whitman covers life, death, contradictions, and more.
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Here are 10 Walt Whitman quotes for writers and about writing from the author of Leaves of Grass. In these quotes, Whitman covers life, death, contradictions, and more.

Walt Whitman worked as a journalist, teacher, and government clerk; he is remembered as one of the great American poets of his time. His most popular work is Leaves of Grass, a collection of poetry he first published on July 4, 1855. The collection would go through seven editions during his lifetime finishing with the "deathbed edition" published in January 1892—two months before his death.

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Many consider Whitman America's greatest poet, but few can deny he's one of the most influential American poets ever—inspiring Langston Hughes, Jack Kerouac, and Adrienne Rich. Bram Stoker even used Whitman as a model for his most iconic character, Dracula.

Here are 10 Walt Whitman quotes for writers and about writing that cover life, death, contradictions, and more.

10 Walt Whitman quotes for writers and about writing

"Do I contradict myself? Very well then I contradict myself."

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"I celebrate myself, and sing myself."

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"I hear America singing."

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"I sound my barbaric yawp over the roofs of the world."

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"I wander all night in my vision..."

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"My Captain does not answer, his lips are pale and still."

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"O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done.'"

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"O living always, always dying!"

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"O setting sun! though the time has come, I still warble under you, if none else does, unmitigated adoration."

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"Tears! tears! tears! In the night, in solitude, tears."

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