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7 Literary Agents Seeking Women's Fiction NOW

Sometimes it's difficult to pinpoint which agents are open to submissions at any given time. So with that in mind, I'm creating some new vertical lists of agents seeking queries right now, as of early 2017.

This list is for women's fiction.

All the agents listed below personally confirmed to me as of early 2017 that they are actively seeking women's fiction novel submissions NOW. Some gave personal notes about their tastes while some did not. Good luck querying!

1. Katie Grimm (Don Congdon Associates)

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Notes: "Looking for women’s fiction with a literary bent, ideally with a social/cultural issue that necessitates a conversation. Unusual structures or concepts are welcome, and I’m open to a wide range of styles – with the intensity of feeling of Elena Ferrante or the irreverence of Maria Semple."

How to Submit: Take a look at the agency's full submission guidelines.

2. Tamar Rydzinski (Laura Dail Literary Agency)

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Notes: Seeking upmarket commercial women's fiction.

How to Submit: Send queries to queries [at] ldlainc.com, and take a look at the agency's full submission guidelines.

3. Patricia Nelson (Marsal Lyon Literary Agency LLC)

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Notes: No specific notes given.

How to Submit: Send queries to patricia [at] marsallyonliteraryagency.com, and take a look at the agency's full submission guidelines.

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4. Suzie Townsend (New Leaf Literary + Media)

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Notes: "Looking for upmarket women's fiction, including novels that would generate great book club discussions, in the vein of Jodi Picoult and novels with an element of mystery or suspense, in the vein of Liane Moriarty."

How to Submit: Send queries to query [at] newleafliterary.com, and take a look at the agency's full submission guidelines.

5. Sarah Bush (Trident Media Group)

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Notes: "Looking for women’s fiction with original, well-developed plotlines and strong female protagonists."

How to Submit: Take a look at the agency's submission guidelines.

6. Bibi Lewis (Ethan Ellenberg Literary Agency)

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Notes: "Looking for smart and sharp writing. Humor, wit, and mystery are big pluses."

How to Submit: Take a look at the agency's full submission guidelines.

7. Quressa Robinson (D4EO Literary Agency)

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Notes: "I'm particularly interested in women's fiction from #ownvoices authors; stories that are upmarket as well as commercial, but with book club appeal. Would love to see nerdy female protagonists."

How to Submit: Send queries to quressa [at] d4eo.com, and take a look at Quressa's full submission guidelines.

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