Skip to main content
Publish date:

Pore Over vs. Pour Over (Grammar Rules)

Let's look at the differences between the phrases pore over and pour over with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

This week, let's look at two phrases that sound the same but have different meanings. One phrase means to study intensely, while the other has to do with causing a stream (usually out of a container).

(20 Homophones Examples for Writers.)

So let's look at the differences between pore over and pour over and when to use each.

Pore Over vs. Pour Over (Grammar Rules)

Pore Over vs. Pour Over

Pore over means to stare or study something intensely. As such, someone might pore over their books to prepare for a test.

(Plot Twist Story Prompts: Weather Breaks.)

Pour over, on the other hand, refers to creating a stream, usually from a container of some sort. For instance, a person may pour water over their face. It can also refer to other connotations of streams, including emotions. In this case, someone may feel happiness or anger pour over them.

Make sense?

Here are a few examples of pore over and pour over:

Correct: She's the type who loves to pore over a pile of books instead of going out.
Incorrect: She's the type who loves to pour over a pile of books instead of going out.

Correct: He prefers his gravy to pour over all the food on his plate.
Incorrect: He prefers his gravy to pore over all the food on his plate.

Most times I try to devise some sort of trick to tell the words/phrases apart, but I'm having trouble with this one. So you have an open invitation to suggest one in the comments below to help your fellow writers.

*****

Grammar and Mechanics

No matter what type of writing you do, mastering the fundamentals of grammar and mechanics is an important first step to having a successful writing career.

Click to continue.

Invoice Template for Freelance Writers

Invoice Template for Freelance Writers

If you're a freelance writer who is able to secure assignments, an essential tool you'll need is an invoice. In this post, Writer's Digest Senior Editor Robert Lee Brewer shares a very basic and easy invoice template for freelance writers to get the job done (and get paid).

3 Things Being a Broadway Wig Master Taught Me About Storytelling

3 Things Being a Broadway Wig Master Taught Me About Storytelling

A career behind the curtain helped Amy Neswald in creating her own stories. Here, the author shares 3 things being a broadway wig master taught her about storytelling.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Out of Control

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Out of Control

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, let things get a little out of control.

November PAD Chapbook Challenge

2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Next Steps

Here are the final steps for the 14th annual November PAD Chapbook Challenge! Use December and the beginning of January to revise and collect your poems into a chapbook manuscript. Here are some tips and guidelines.

NaNoWriMo’s Over … Now What?

NaNoWriMo’s Over … Now What?

After an intense writing challenge, you might feel a little lost. Here are some tips from Managing Editor and fellow Wrimo Moriah Richard for capitalizing on your momentum.

Ian Douglas: On Telling the Truth in Science Fiction

Ian Douglas: On Telling the Truth in Science Fiction

New York Times bestselling author Ian Douglas discusses how he incorporated implausible conspiracy theories to uncover the truth in his new science fiction novel, Alien Hostiles.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 589

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a yesterday poem.

Revenge

Revenge

Every writer needs a little inspiration once in a while. For today's prompt, write about revenge.

Peter Fiennes: On Finding Hope in the Writing Process

Peter Fiennes: On Finding Hope in the Writing Process

Critically acclaimed author Peter Fiennes discusses his quest to find hope in his new travel/Greek mythology book, A Thing of Beauty.