Read These Successful Query Letters

Writing a book is fun. Writing a query letter is stressful. Here are some resources to help you write a successful query.
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Writing a book is fun. Writing a query letter is stressful. In your book, you can add layers of backstory and extra pages to let your full story flow. In a query letter, you basically have four tiny paragraphs to say "PICK ME! PICK ME!"

Holy crap, I'm having grade-school playground flashbacks.

So what's the best plan of attack to creating a pitch-perfect query letter? I'm a firm believer in learning by reading query letters that actually landed agents. Our Guide to Literary Agents editor Chuck Sambuchino (who speaks on this topic at conferences regularly) has inside connections to agents who share with him actual query letters that landed writers agents. These include commentary from the signing agent that explains why it worked.

Read These Successful Query Letters

Check out the Successful Queries series here and take notes. You spend countless hours on your book. It's worth investing time in your query letter. If you handle it correctly you won't have to yell "PICK ME!" so loudly.

Here are a few recent Successful Queries from Chuck's GLA blog:

Query Letter in 14 Days

Take your writing one step further and tackle the publishing process. When you enroll in this online course, you'll learn the details of the query letter format and how to write a query letter that catches the attention of agents and publishers.

Click to continue.

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