One Thing Is Constant: Change

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Welcome to the new Poetic Asides blog!

While I'd known there was a WritersDigest.com re-design going on this year, I didn't realize until this week (and even this day) the full extent of the changes it would bring to this blog. If you're still getting used to it, you're not alone: I am too.

However, I'm sure that by the middle of August we'll all be feeling more comfortable with our new home.

We have changed blogging platforms from Dasblog to Wordpress, so I'm hopeful that will translate into a better blogging experience for all. One feature I'm excited about is that I'll finally be able to schedule posts ahead of time, which should help throughout the year, but especially during April and November when we're writing a poem-a-day.

As many of you noticed, the posts since June 22 have disappeared. I've added back in Wednesday's Poetry Prompt, but I still need to get the others in there. Of course, I'm going on a long overdue vacation starting tonight, so while I'll try to add the posts in as soon as possible, they might not all make it back in until early August.

Also, I am still hoping to announce the winner of the Poetic Form Challenge either today or tomorrow. So stay tuned for that.

Besides that, let me know what you think about the WritersDigest.com redesign and this blog down below. I'm as new to it as you are, so don't feel any need to pull punches on my account.

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