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Agent Update: Rachel Vogel

In the annual "Get an Agent" feature of Writer's Digest, we work hard to feature a multitude of agents who are actively seeking new writers. We also seek agents who don't have the intention of leaving the business, or who aren't actively in the process of switching agencies (or looking to close to submissions). Every once in a while, though, things happen that are beyond our (and the agents'!) control.

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With this in mind, I wanted to update the listing for Rachel Vogel (formerly of Waxman Leavell Literary Agency). She just recently moved on to Dunow, Carlson & Lerner Literary Agency. Here's her updated bio on the DCL Agency website:

Rachel Vogel began her career in publishing in 2004, with stints as a production editor at Henry Holt and as a book scout at Maria B. Campbell Associates. She went on to agent at Lippincott Massie McQuilkin, Mary Evans, Inc. (where she was also the director of foreign rights), and Waxman Leavell Literary Agency. She represents nonfiction of all kinds, including photography, humor, pop culture, history, memoir, investigative journalism, current events, science, and more. On the fiction side, she seeks out novels that pay equal attention to voice and plot. A graduate of UMass Amherst's Commonwealth College, she lives in Brooklyn.

Based on that, it's fair to say that Rachel's fiction and nonfiction interests, as listed in the October 2017 issue, are still the same.

Interested in querying Rachel? Query letters for DCL are preferred via email (mail [at] dclagency [dot] com). Below your query, paste the first ten pages of your manuscript. Do not send attachments. Due to the volume of inquiries the agency receives, they are unable to respond to all emailed queries.

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