Making a Human Connection

Author:
Publish date:

Some Writers Deserve to Starve! by Elaura Niles

Since many publishing executives are insecure, its essential to make a human connection. Here are some tips:

Image placeholder title
  1. Leave your dog, Ego, at home.
    If you don' understand something, ask. Don't try to seem more important, educated, or intelligent than you are. Don't try to "cover." Be honest. People love to work with equals.
  2. Ask questions.
    It can build a bond between you and your audience. But never get too personal or ask too many questions. Acceptable topics are sports ("Did you see that game last night?"), food ("Have you tried that new restaurant over on Fourth?"), or business ("Did you hear that Disney is going to restructure again?"). Note: Don't use that last question if you are pitching a Disney exec.
  3. Listen to the answers.
    You may not believe that the twenty-year-old executive across the desk from you has had enough life experience to wax on about the drawbacks of social security on the national economy and his paycheck, but keep your mouth shut. Nod along. Better yet, be fascinated.
  4. Make it seem like a conversation.
    Conversations are made of give and take. Expect to give a lot more. Not words. Compassion, understanding, and empathetic rage if necessary. Listen to their extemporaneous speeches for as long as they run, then keep your responses brief, to the point, and witty (though not wittier than the executive). They may find your intriguing. It does happen. Just don't forget to pitch your story.

Remember, the goal is to connect. If you decide to work together, you're going to have a lot more conversations.

Amanda Jayatissa: On Spiraling Out in Suspense

Amanda Jayatissa: On Spiraling Out in Suspense

Author Amanda Jayatissa discusses the fun of writing "deliciously mean" characters in her psychological thriller, My Sweet Girl.

3 Tips for Writing a Memoir Everyone Wants to Read

3 Tips for Writing a Memoir Everyone Wants to Read

A memoir is an open window into another's life—and although the truth is of paramount importance, so too is grabbing hold of its reader. Writer Tasha Keeble offers 3 tips for writing a memoir everyone will want to read.

Zoe Whittall: On Personal Change in Literary Fiction

Zoe Whittall: On Personal Change in Literary Fiction

Bestselling and Giller Prize-shortlisted author Zoe Whittal discusses the complexity of big life decisions in her new novel, The Spectacular.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 582

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a transition poem.

4 Myths About Writing Animal Characters

4 Myths About Writing Animal Characters

Author Codi Schneider debunks four myths about writing animal characters, including that audiences won't connect with animal characters and that they're only for children's books.

Voyager

Voyager

Every writer needs a little inspiration once in a while. For today's prompt, your character is a modern day voyager.

Stephanie Marie Thornton: One How an Entire Rewrite Added Suspense

Stephanie Marie Thornton: On How an Entire Rewrite Added Suspense

USA Today bestselling author discusses how rewriting a portion of her new historical fiction novel, A Most Clever Girl, added suspense.

Creativity Is Making Small Choices

Creativity Is Making Small Choices

When struggling to work through a creative dilemma, it's best to think of your work in small pieces that create a larger whole. Author Perttu Pölönen explains how creativity is a collection of small choices from an abundance of options.

Zibby Books Market Spotlight

Zibby Books: Market Spotlight

For this market spotlight, we look at Zibby Books, a brand new book publisher (just announced earlier today) that wants to introduce a new model with book champions and ambassadors to the publishing and promotion process.