Build Your Platform

Author:
Publish date:

Write Is a Verb: Sit Down. Start Writing. No Excuses.

What is a platform? It is the physical evidence of anything you have accomplished in your field, or related to your specific topic, and/or the accumulated evidence of your experience and ability to write books and sell them. It may also include how big and motivated your potential audience is. Here's how you start measuring and identifying your platform.

  1. List all of the public speaking you have done.
  2. List quotes from well-known people who say good things about you, your work, or your workshop/book.
  3. List any Web sites you have access to that could spread the word about you, your work, or your project. How many visitors do they receive every week or month?
  4. List any Web sites you maintain or regularly contribute to. How many visitors do these sites receive?
  5. List any mailing lists you have compiled and how many names are on it (e-mail, snail mail).
  6. List any newsletters in which you are regularly featured or that put in a special announcement about you.
  7. List any conferences where you have presented or will present.
  8. List any TV, radio shows, Web sites, or podcasts on which you have been featured or could be featured (based on your own connections).
  9. Make copies of articles, video, and audio of media appearances or presentations.
  10. Make copies of interviews you have given or any articles in which you've been quoted.
  11. List all awards you have received.
  12. List all of your good reviews.
  13. List any advertising you have done that features you or your work.
  14. List all of your degrees, if relevant to the book topic.
  15. Gather copies of books and articles you have written or in which you have been featured.
  16. Gather statistics and evidence that there is a good-sized audience for your book idea or there is a trend that would support your book.
  17. List all publicity that you will do in support of your book.
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