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New Literary Agent Alert: Caitie Flum of Liza Dawson Associates

Caitie is seeking: Commercial and upmarket fiction with great characters and superb writing, especially historical fiction, mysteries/thrillers of all kinds, magical realism, and book club fiction; historical fiction with unusual perspectives and stories told in a unique way; police procedurals, cozy mysteries, psychological thrillers, and amateur sleuths, especially those with series potential; book club/women’s fiction that shows characters that have made the hard or unpredictable choice or are funny yet poignant stories; young adult and new adult. "Please send me books of all these genres that have diversity!"

Reminder: New literary agents (with this spotlight featuring Caitie Flum of Liza Dawson Associates) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list.

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About Caitie: Caitie Flum joined Liza Dawson Associates in July 2014 as assistant and audio rights manager. She graduated from Hofstra University in 2009 with a BA in English with a concentration in publishing studies. Caitie interned at Hachette Book Group and Writers House. She was an Editorial Assistant then Coordinator for Bookspan, where she worked on several clubs including the Book-of-the-Month Club, The Good Cook, and the Children's Book-of-the-Month Club. She is taking on her own clients in 2015. Caitie grew up in Ohio where she developed her love of reading everything she could get her hands on. She lives in New Jersey with her husband where, in her free time, she can be found cooking, reading, going to the theater, or intensely playing board games.

(Hear a dozen agents explain exactly what they want to see the slush pile. See if your work is a match.)

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Caitie is seeking: Commercial and upmarket fiction with great characters and superb writing, especially historical fiction, mysteries/thrillers of all kinds, magical realism, and book club fiction.

"In historical fiction, I would love to see unusual perspectives and stories told in a unique way. I am eager for police procedurals, cozy mysteries, psychological thrillers, and amateur sleuths, especially those with series potential. I love book club/women’s fiction that shows characters that have made the hard or unpredictable choice or are funny yet poignant stories. Please send me books of all these genres that have diversity!

"I am looking for Young Adult and New Adult projects, particularly romance, historical fiction, mysteries and thrillers, and contemporary books with diverse characters.

"In nonfiction, I am looking for memoirs that make people look at the world differently, narrative nonfiction that's impossible to put down, books on pop culture, theater, current events, women’s issues, and humor.

"I am not looking for science fiction, fantasy, westerns, military fiction, self-help, science, middle grade, or picture books."


How to submit to Caitie: [Note from the editor. There was some confusion over this email address. I got a note from a subscriber that said he received a bounce-back after trying to email her. I then incorrectly edited the email address to a slightly different variation, which sent emails to one of her coworkers instead. Caitie emailed me to say the original email address (updated after this text to "querycaitie") is the right one. If you emailed the previous incorrect email address, your email reached a co-agent and was passed along to Caitie -- no worries.]

Email your query in the body of the e-mail to querycaitie [at] lizadawsonassociates.com.

(How can writers compose an exciting Chapter 1?)

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