Skip to main content

How to Land Testimonials (Let People Brag About You)

If you want to have testimonials to use in promoting your writing and platform, you have to be proactive. Here's how. by Christina Katz

Have you ever wondered why testimonials are always so positive? It’s because that’s what “testimonial” means: a favorable report on your work’s qualities and virtues. But if you want to have testimonials to use in promoting your writing and platform, you have to be proactive.

• Just ask. Ninety-nine percent of the time, when you ask, your former client, customer, student or reader will give you a brief testimonial cheerfully and quickly. For classes and speaking engagements, simply keep feedback forms handy. Good testimonials clarify. They illustrate. Most important, they help people understand whether or not what you have to offer might interest them.

• Keep track. Keep feelers out for what other people are saying about you. Google your name and identity (blog, website, etc.) routinely, or set up Google Alerts on google.com to do it for you and send you daily e-mail reports. This is also a great way to catch news related to your platform topic that you might otherwise miss.

• Build a file. Clips and links to what reliable sources say about you make up the second most important file for writers, right after the one of your published writing. By collecting examples of what others have said, you can take the public by the hand and lead it right to your latest buzz.

Writer's Digest Best Live Streams, Podcasts, and YouTube Channels 2022

Writer's Digest Best Live Streams, Podcasts, and YouTube Channels 2022

Here are the top live streams, podcasts, and YouTube channels as identified in the 24th Annual 101 Best Websites from the May/June 2022 issue of Writer's Digest.

What Is Fan Fiction in Writing?

What Is Fan Fiction in Writing?

You might have heard the term, especially if you’re in online fandoms, but what exactly is fan fiction? Managing Editor Moriah Richard explains.

5 Ways To Use Short Stories To Grow as a Writer

5 Ways To Use Short Stories To Grow as a Writer

Short story writing can be a gateway to writing your novel—but they’re also fun and worthy stories in their own right. Here, author Dallas Woodburn shares 5 ways to use short stories to grow as a writer.

Writing Mistakes Writers Make: Not Having an Online Presence

Writing Mistakes Writers Make: Not Having an Online Presence

The Writer's Digest team has witnessed many writing mistakes over the years, so we started this series to help identify them for other writers (along with correction strategies). This week's writing mistake is not having an online presence.

Shirlene Obuobi: On Writing From Experience

Shirlene Obuobi: On Writing From Experience

Physician, cartoonist, and author Shirlene Obuobi discusses the writerly advice that led to writing her new coming-of-age novel, On Rotation.

WD Poetic Form Challenge

WD Poetic Form Challenge: Kimo Winner

Learn the winner and Top 10 list for the Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the kimo.

8 Things Writers Should Know About Tattoos

8 Things Writers Should Know About Tattoos

Tattoos and their artists can reveal interesting details about your characters and offer historical context. Here, author June Gervais shares 8 things writers should know about tattoos.

Tyler Moss | Reporting Through Lens of Social Justice

Writing Through the Lens of Social Justice

WD Editor-at-Large Tyler Moss makes the case for reporting on issues of social justice in freelance writing—no matter the topic in this article from the July/August 2021 issue of Writer's Digest.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Intentional Trail

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Intentional Trail

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have a character leave clues for people to find them.