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A Legal Checklist for Writers

If you answer “yes” to any of these questions, you should take special care that you’re not risking an invasion of privacy or defamation charge. by Amy Cook
  • Author:
  • Publish date:

1. Are you writing about real people?

2. Are they recognizable to readers?

3. Are you making disputable statements of fact?

4. Are you disclosing private, possibly embarrassing information?

5. Are the matters discussed of concern to the community at large (not just your family)?

6. Are you disclosing a crime? How recent?

7. Is the individual in question a private person (as opposed to a public figure)?

Want more legal advice? Consider:
Legal Issues Affecting Writers

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