Skip to main content
Publish date:

Your Story 50: The Winners!

Prompt: Write the opening sentence (25 words or fewer) to a story based on the photo to the left.

Prompt: Write the opening sentence (25 words or fewer) to a story based on the photo to the left.

Your Story 50 prompt

Thanks to everyone who entered and/or in Your Story 50! Here are the results. The winners in ranking order are as follows:

1. As Mike stood watching, his only thought was: If I’m standing here, who the hell is flying the plane? (Russell Heidorn)

2. As I watched the plane leave with the last of humanity, I knew I was completely on my own. (Amanda Johnson)

3. I don’t know what’s worse about traveling back to the 20th century—flying in a plane or wearing these pants. (Beth Hatcher)

4. Missing his flight was actually the least of Matt’s worries—considering he was only flying to California to break Amelia’s heart. (Megan Cooper)

5. My life wasn’t a ’90s romantic comedy and Homeland Security was always watching, so I didn’t run wildly across the tarmac to stop the plane. (Mirriam Shah)

6. I never thought producing the world’s largest window sticker would be my pinnacle position in life. (Stephanie Groen)

7. Walter realized at that moment why his new home, with its million-dollar view, was obtained for such a preposterously low price. (John Pearson)

8. Tightly gripping her letter and standing beneath his newest addition, John realized his passion for model airplanes had gone too far. (Candace Running)

9. Paul stood in the silent terminal and stared out the window at the plane as it just hung there, neither landing nor taking off. (Dale Long)

10. “We have powers beyond human imagining,” whispered the slender, swaying plants as the craft hung suspended and the traveler, summoned to the window, stared. (Jeffrey Fishbein)

8 Tips for Developing a Thrilling Espionage Premise

8 Tips for Developing a Thrilling Espionage Premise

Maintaining tension and high stakes requires careful attention in the writing process. Ambassador Philip Kaplan offers 8 tips for developing a thrilling espionage premise that helped him in writing his debut book, Night in Tehran.

November PAD Chapbook Challenge

2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 24

For the 2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets are tasked with writing a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write a response poem.

NaNoWriMo: Almost to the Finish Line

NaNoWriMo: Almost to the Finish Line

Writing fatigue can hit like a bowling ball from the sky when you’re at the end of a writing challenge. Let these quotes from NaNoWriMo Pep Talks give you a boost of inspiration.

Holiday Gifts for Logomaniacs: 15 Gift Ideas for Word Lovers, Editors, Translators, and Writers

Holiday Gifts for Logomaniacs: 15 Gift Ideas for Word Lovers, Editors, Translators, and Writers

From the practical to the entertaining, Gabriella Aldeman offers 15 gift ideas for the writer in your life.

Misplaced Jealousy

Misplaced Jealousy

Every writer needs a little inspiration once in a while. For today's prompt, your story's conflict stems from misplaced jealousy.

November PAD Chapbook Challenge

2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge: Day 23

For the 2021 November PAD Chapbook Challenge, poets are tasked with writing a poem a day in the month of November before assembling a chapbook manuscript in the month of December. Today's prompt is to write an Unplug and/or Plug In poem.

New Letters: Market Spotlight

New Letters: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at New Letters, a literary publication that seeks poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.

Censer vs. Censor vs. Sensor (Grammar Rules)

Censer vs. Censor vs. Sensor (Grammar Rules)

Let's look at the differences between censer, censor, and sensor with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

A Conversation About Addiction and the Family Dynamic

A Conversation About Addiction and the Family Dynamic

Authors Jessica Lahey and Lynne Reeves Griffin have an open discussion on writing complicated realities, the intersection of memoir and nonfiction, and more.