Do You Like Poetry Prompts?

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Okay, this post is a little different in that I have an announcement and a request. I'm excited about the announcement and humbled by the request. So let's jump into the announcement!

Announcing the Smash Poetry Journal!

If you search for the Smash Poetry Journal on Amazon right now, you'll find it, and you can even order it. But it doesn't have a finalized cover yet, though I wish I could share it, because it looks super duper cool, whether it's finalized or not.

Either way, I'm excited to share that I have a new book coming out in time for National Poetry Month (April 2019): Smash Poetry Journal: 125 Writing Ideas for Inspiration and Exploration. I've been going through a proof of the book today, and it includes 125 prompts from the Poetic Asides blog (picked from the Poem-A-Day challenges and Wednesday Poetry Prompts).

It's really a beautiful book with plenty of prompts and room to write. After more than 10 years and 1,000 prompts, I'm so stoked to see a book coming together. Kind of feels like a dream really.

 Robert Lee Brewer

Robert Lee Brewer

But I also have a request!

And no, it's not to buy the book, though I'm not saying don't buy the book either (here's the link on Amazon for the curious). But honestly, most people who read this post have been poeming along with me for years, and I'd like to ask if you wouldn't mind writing up a one- or two-sentence endorsement of the prompts.

That is, could you share how the prompts have helped you?

For some, maybe you used the prompts to write poems that you eventually got published (maybe even collected in a book). Others may have used the prompts to write their first ever poems. Or maybe they helped you break out of a rut after a period of not being able to write.

Whatever your story (within a sentence or two blurb), I'd love to hear it. If my editor/designer approves it, we may include it on the cover. And anyone who makes it on the cover will receive a free contributor copy for contributing to the effort. If I get enough, I may include them in a future blog post, whether they get on the book or not, though I won't be able to give out free copies for endorsements featured on the blog only.

To submit for consideration, please do the following:

  • Include 1- to 2-sentence endorsement in the body of an email...
  • ...sent to robert.brewer@fwmedia.com...
  • ...with the subject line: Poetry Prompt Endorsement
  • And please include your name as you would like it to appear in print (or on a blog post) if selected
  • Deadline is next Wednesday (10/24)...sorry in advance for the tight turnaround

If you make the cover, I'll send you an email requesting your mailing address for when contributor copies are ready to send next April.

If you need an example of an endorsement to give you ideas on how to write your own, here's a fake endorsement (written by myself): "Robert Lee Brewer's prompts helped me spring free of the poetic rut I was in for more than a year. Now, I poem every day, and I'm not looking back." - Robert Lee Brewer

Thanks so much!

Robert

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