3 Amazon Secrets Every Author Needs to Know

Rob Eagar offers up three essential Amazon secrets and hacks for authors to write and sell books on Amazon, including how to change the marketing text for your book, getting email subscribers through Kindle Direct Publishing, and identifying your target audience.
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Amazon has always been a secretive organization. For example, Jeff Bezos never divulges how many Kindle devices the company actually sells. Instead, he makes cryptic remarks such as, "It's the bestselling product in our store." Also, Amazon doesn't reveal how much money they make selling books. Those financial numbers are rolled into their "Media" division that includes movies and other products. In addition, Amazon keeps a lot of book marketing secrets hidden from the world. If you write and sell books on Amazon, here are 3 secrets every author needs to know:

Secret 1: You can change your book's marketing copy at any time for free.

Language is the power of the book sale. In other words, the marketing text that people see about your book on Amazon greatly determines their decision to purchase. However, most authors feel frustrated by the inability to change their book’s marketing text on Amazon whenever they desire.

For example, if you’re a traditionally-published author, maybe you’re disappointed with the boring or outdated marketing text that the publisher put on your book's Amazon page. If you’re self-published, maybe you used a third-party company to get your book listed on Amazon, and you feel blocked from making important changes to your book’s marketing copy.

Rob Eagar offers up three essential Amazon secrets and hacks for authors, including how to change the marketing text for your book, getting email subscribers through Kindle Direct Publishing, and identifying your target audience.Here's a little secret. Amazon offers a hidden "back door" that lets you update your book's marketing text whenever you desire. For instance, maybe you recently received an amazing endorsement, won an industry award, or hit a bestseller list. All you have to do is set up a free Author Central account with Amazon. Once your account is created, you get full control to adjust your marketing text, editorial reviews, and author bio. Use this secret to improve the way your books are displayed to shoppers on Amazon.

3 Amazon Secrets Authors Need to Know to Write and Sell Books

Secret 2: You can grow your author email list using Amazon's huge audience.

Amazon attracts more book readers than anyone else on the planet. Did you know those readers can be converted into email subscribers for free? It's possible by using Amazon's Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP) service to set up permanently free e-books that drive readers to your author email list. I call these free resources "Bait Books," because they serve as appealing bait that attracts new readers to you.

This secret has two simple steps. First, create an e-book using KDP and place it in Amazon’s Kindle Store as a free download. Inside your e-book, put a special offer for more free content that drives readers to a landing page on your author website. When they go to that landing page, they can join your email list to access the bonus content.

Once you set up a Bait Book, it will run non-stop in the background and help build your email list while you write your next book. The best part is that everything can be created for free. Plus, you can purchase inexpensive Amazon ads to help promote your bait book and make sure the right type of reader sees it.

Secret 3: Amazon will help identify how to find your target audience.

Authors constantly wonder who their readers are. Amazon doesn’t share customer contact information, so you never know who actually buys your books. However, there is a secret way to identify your target audience.

Go to your book’s Amazon page and look at the "Customers Also Bought" section. This data reveals similar titles and authors to you and your book. How is this data helpful? It explains where to direct your advertising efforts on Facebook and Amazon.

For instance, if you see "Author X" frequently displayed in your "Customers Also Bought" list, then you should advertise to people who like Author X on Facebook and Amazon. Why? Because Amazon verified that people who like Author X also like your books. This information can save a lot of time and money determining the best way to maximize your advertising budget.

I hope you will take advantage of these three secrets to sell more books on Amazon. However, there are other exciting ways to increase your sales on Amazon. That's why I’ve partnered with Writer’s Digest to offer an online video course Mastering Amazon for Authors. Watch 11 self-guided teaching videos that explain all of these secrets and much more. For example, here are other Amazon secrets you will learn:

  • How to write persuasive text that converts Amazon shoppers into readers.
  • How to get more Amazon customer reviews for free.
  • How to get your books noticed on Amazon's massive website.
  • How to create Amazon ads that drive readers directly to your books.

This online workshop takes you directly into Amazon's website through guided video tutorials, shows how everything works, and walks you step-by-step through the details to increase your book sales.

It's no secret that Amazon dominates the publishing industry. Currently, they sell nearly 50% of all print books and over 70% of all e-books in America! If you want to reach more readers and sell more books, you must learn how to sell more books on Amazon.

Use my three secrets described in this article and get detailed instruction by registering for Mastering Amazon for Authors. As your instructor, I’ll be available to answer your specific questions in a private forum.

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