Choose Your Own Commenting Adventure

Author:
Publish date:

When I was a wee lad of middle school angst years, I enjoyed those
Choose Your Own Adventure books, mostly because I felt like I had
control of the pending situation, even if I could never figure out to
keep from shaking the branch to retrieve Carlos's backpack whilst the
Abominable Snowman lurked around.

With that said and because it is the week before the Day of Labor,
which means this blog will be labor intensive, I am trying something
new here, giving you a taste of a writing exercise that you may or
may not choose to do, enjoy, or utilize. I will start off a story and
then pass it along to the comment section. You can continue the story
in the comments (writing up to 4 sentences or just a single line or
whatever you want really) but always leaving the last sentence
partially done, so that someone can come in and pick up where you
left off... you'll see what I mean. Anyway, this just means that you
have to look and see what was written by the person who commented
previously. There is potential for this to be a disaster, or a
masterpiece, or whatever, but I always liked doing these things in
writing workshops, and if I like it, doesn't that mean that everyone
else has to like it as well? Anyways, this is a beta version of
something like this, so just have fun with it, be as ridiculous as
you want to be, and--if it's good-- I will copy and paste this into a
word doc, claim I wrote the whole thing and submit it to the Paris
Review.

Here we go:

"Casey didn't see her coming. He'd just arrived at the Our House for
his blind date with Melinda and was running over the check list of
things he wanted to talk about (her work, hobbies, whether or not
she enjoyed scary movies or better yet Scary Movie, and anything that
would lead back to him talking about bench pressing) when he felt
someone sneak up behind him and squeeze his sides. He turned around
and..."

Yeah, so the first person to comment start by finishing this stellar
sentence and then go on for a few, and leave it hanging for the next
person... and we'll keep going until we figure out just what got real
with Casey's blind date adventure.

I'm literally nervous (for Case). Songs of 1996 ensue.

Give me one,
reason

Tracy Chapman

Books and Authors to Check Out in 2021

71 Books and Authors to Check Out in 2021!

Need a book to read in 2021? Want to find a new author to check out? Then, explore this list of 71 books and authors featured in our author spotlight series in a variety of genres.

How Do I Get My Poetry Published?

How Do I Get My Poetry Published?

Learn how to get your poetry published, whether you're trying to get a poem or an entire book of poems published.

Dyslexia Is a Writer's Superpower (With Help)

Dyslexia Is a Writer's Superpower (With Help)

Author PJ Manney shares how dyslexia, dysgraphia, and dyscalculia should not be viewed as impediments to becoming a writer. Rather, they should be viewed as writing superpowers, especially when paired with certain technologies.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Falsely Accused

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Falsely Accused

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have a character get falsely accused for something.

By Any Means Necessary: Finding Unorthodox Ways to Break-In

By Any Means Necessary: Finding Unorthodox Ways to Break-In

Novelist D. Eric Maikranz gives advice for how to get your readers to sit up and take notice of your work in untraditional ways.

M.M. Chouinard: On Jumping From One Project to Another

M.M. Chouinard: On Jumping From One Project to Another

Novelist M.M. Chouinard immediately started writing her second book after finishing her first and shares here why that was the best decision she could have made.

How to Write a Eulogy When the Need Arises

How to Write a Eulogy When the Need Arises

While plenty of eulogies are delivered by a clergy member, the perspective provided by a close friend or family member can retell cherished memories of the deceased. If you find yourself needing to pen one, let this advice by Paul Vachon guide you.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 564

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a disappointment poem.

How to Approach Friends and Family About Your Memoir

How to Approach Friends and Family About Your Memoir

No one can decide whether showing your memoir to loved ones before it goes to press is the right choice for you. However, if you're planning to approach your friends and family about it, let memoirist Ronit Plank give you 3 tips for doing so.