Skip to main content

Comedy vs. Comity (Grammar Rules)

There's nothing funny about learning when to use comedy and comity (OK, maybe a little humor) with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

Is there anything funny about comedy and comity? I mean, one involves humor, while the other is all about social harmony. So yeah, I guess these two terms can both coexist with a joke or three. Know any?

(7 Comedy Writing Techniques.)

OK, here's one:

Question: What do you get when you give a writer a deadline?
Answer: A really clean house.

I'm sorry; it's Monday. Soooo in this post, we're going to look at the differences in comedy and comity and when to use each.

Comedy vs. Comity (Grammar Rules)

Comedy vs. Comity

Comedy is a noun that refers to one of the following: a narrative style in which humor is involved throughout and most characters are happy at the end; funny event or occurrence; and/or comic element. Comedy, when done well, tends to make people laugh.

(A List of Funny Words to Help You Write Funnier Stories.)

Comity, on the other hand, is a noun that refers to either social harmony or the avoidance of converting or attempting to convert members of another religious denomination (for instance, Baptists not trying to convert Methodists). It is also used in law to indicate the shared recognition of governmental laws and actions. A place with a good deal of comity offers a friendly and tolerant environment, or, at the very least, respectful of each other's authority. As such, it may be a nice place to share a non-offensive joke (or to break the comity with an offensive one, I suppose).

Make sense?

Here are a few examples of comedy and comity:

Correct: Most people laughed at his fart jokes, but that's just not my kind of comedy.
Incorrect: Most people laughed at his fart jokes, but that's just not my kind of comity.

Correct: Despite their personal differences, the principal and education board projected comity when it came to the school calendar.
Incorrect: Despite their personal differences, the principal and education board projected comedy when it came to the school calendar.

At the end of the day, comedy is funny, and comity is harmonious. And that makes me think of "What's So Funny About Peace, Love, and Understanding," by Elvis Costello & the Attractions.

There's nothing funny about comity, but peace, love, and understanding can lead to comedy.

*****

Grammar and Mechanics

No matter what type of writing you do, mastering the fundamentals of grammar and mechanics is an important first step to having a successful writing career.

Click to continue.

writer's digest wd presents

WD Presents: 6 WDU Courses, an Upcoming Virtual Conference, and More!

This week, we’re excited to announce six new WDU courses, a romance writing virtual conference, and more!

Going From Me to We: Collaborating on the Writing of a Novel

Going From Me to We: Collaborating on the Writing of a Novel

Past experiences taught bestselling author Alan Russell to tread lightly when it came to collaborating on projects. Here, he discusses how the right person and the right story helped him go from a “me” to a “we.”

From Script

Short Film Goals, Writing the Cinematic Experience on the Page and Sundance Film Festival 2022 (From Script)

In this week’s round up brought to us by Script magazine, set your creative goals with a monthly guide to write and produce your short film, provided by Script contributor Rebecca Norris Resnick. Plus, an exclusive interview with Academy Award-winning screenwriter William Monahan, a Sundance Film Festival 2022 day one recap, and more!

Your Story Writing Prompts

94 Your Story Writing Prompts

Due to popular demand, we've assembled all the Your Story writing prompts on WritersDigest.com in one post. Click the link to find each prompt, the winners, and more.

How Inspiration and Research Shape a Novel

How Inspiration and Research Shape a Novel

Historical fiction relies on research to help a story’s authenticity—but it can also lead to developments in the story itself. Here, author Lora Davies discusses how inspiration and research helped shape her new novel, The Widow’s Last Secret.

Poetic Forms

Saraband: Poetic Forms

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the saraband, a septet (or seven-line) form based on a forbidden dance.

Karen Hamilton: On Cause and Effect

Karen Hamilton: On Cause and Effect

International bestselling author Karen Hamilton discusses the “then and now” format of her new domestic thriller, The Ex-Husband.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: The Ultimatum

Plot Twist Story Prompts: The Ultimatum

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have a character give or face an ultimatum.

6 Things Every Writer Should Know About Sylvia Beach and Shakespeare and Company

6 Things Every Writer Should Know About Sylvia Beach and Shakespeare and Company

Sylvia Beach was friend to many writers who wrote what we consider classics today. Here, author Kerri Maher shares six things everyone should know about her and Shakespeare and Company.