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Join Facebook: Day 5 of the 2015 October Platform Challenge

After years of running various challenges, I've learned one thing: The weekend is a common place for folks to get distracted and lose track of tasks. If you find yourself in this boat, no problem. Get caught up on Monday. The weekend was focused on blogs and websites.

Join Facebook

For today's platform-building task, join Facebook. If you have an account already, great! Read some of my tips below on how to optimize your Facebook account. If you don't already have an account, go to Facebook.com, sign up (it's free), and complete your profile.

Once you've accomplished this, check back here for tips below on how to optimize your Facebook account. You'll start out ahead of the curve.

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Social Media for Writers

Social Media for Writers

Find Success With Social Media!

Do you want to build a following and sell more books? Learn how in the 60-minute Social Media for Writers webinar, led by social media gurus Tee Morris and Philippa Ballantine.

Beginning with set up and ending with best practices and online etiquette, writers will learn:

  • A friendly, accessible approach to mastering the various social media platforms
  • Strategies for drawing the attention of prospective readers
  • How to build an audience and sell more books
  • How to create an effective social media persona
  • And more!

Click to continue.

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Tips for Optimizing Facebook

There are any number of things a writer can do to optimize Facebook, and there are creative uses introduced all the time. That said, there are some proven principles that will immediately set you ahead of the average user.

Here are some tips for optimizing Facebook:

  • Complete your profile (completely). Include your byline name, your education, your interests, etc., especially as it relates to your writing platform.
  • Set your profile to public. If you want to grow your audience, you need to make it easy for folks to find you. And since you'll have a public profile, remember that it IS, indeed, public. Don't do or say anything you wouldn't feel comfortable doing in front of a room packed with a thousand or more people.
  • Include a profile image of you. Not your pet. Or your child (or grandchildren). Or an animated character. Or whatever. The image should be of you for a couple reasons: One, it makes it easier for people hunting for you to know that they've got the right person. Two, it looks more professional.
  • Post regularly. That may be once a day--or once every couple days. Try to at least post or share something once a week, because that's a good way to let people know that you're actively using your account. Some people "stalk" or "people watch" without posting anything, but the average user just considers such accounts "abandoned." Plus, it's hard to make connections and/or grow your audience if you're not sharing.

Connect with friends and family, sure, but also look to connect with other writers and readers. Follow publishers and publications in which you'd like to be published. And search for groups that appeal to your target audience.

By the way, I can be found on Facebook at http://facebook.com/robertleebrewer.

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer’s Digest Writing Community, which includes editing Writer’s Market and Poet’s Market. He regularly blogs at the Poetic Asides blog and writes a poetry column for Writer’s Digest magazine. He also leads online education, speaks on writing and publishing at events around the country, and does other fun writing-related stuff.

roberttwitterimage

A published poet, he’s the author of Solving the World’s Problems (Press 53) and a former Poet Laureate of the Blogosphere.

Follow him on Twitter @RobertLeeBrewer.

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Catch up on the first three days of the Platform Challenge here:

Going From Me to We: Collaborating on the Writing of a Novel

Going From Me to We: Collaborating on the Writing of a Novel

Past experiences taught bestselling author Alan Russell to tread lightly when it came to collaborating on projects. Here, he discusses how the right person and the right story helped him go from a “me” to a “we.”

From Script

Short Film Goals, Writing the Cinematic Experience on the Page and Sundance Film Festival 2022 (From Script)

In this week’s round up brought to us by Script magazine, set your creative goals with a monthly guide to write and produce your short film, provided by Script contributor Rebecca Norris Resnick. Plus, an exclusive interview with Academy Award-winning screenwriter William Monahan, a Sundance Film Festival 2022 day one recap, and more!

Your Story Writing Prompts

94 Your Story Writing Prompts

Due to popular demand, we've assembled all the Your Story writing prompts on WritersDigest.com in one post. Click the link to find each prompt, the winners, and more.

How Inspiration and Research Shape a Novel

How Inspiration and Research Shape a Novel

Historical fiction relies on research to help a story’s authenticity—but it can also lead to developments in the story itself. Here, author Lora Davies discusses how inspiration and research helped shape her new novel, The Widow’s Last Secret.

Poetic Forms

Saraband: Poetic Forms

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the saraband, a septet (or seven-line) form based on a forbidden dance.

Karen Hamilton: On Cause and Effect

Karen Hamilton: On Cause and Effect

International bestselling author Karen Hamilton discusses the “then and now” format of her new domestic thriller, The Ex-Husband.

Plot Twist Story Prompts: The Ultimatum

Plot Twist Story Prompts: The Ultimatum

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have a character give or face an ultimatum.

6 Things Every Writer Should Know About Sylvia Beach and Shakespeare and Company

6 Things Every Writer Should Know About Sylvia Beach and Shakespeare and Company

Sylvia Beach was friend to many writers who wrote what we consider classics today. Here, author Kerri Maher shares six things everyone should know about her and Shakespeare and Company.

How Writers Can Apply Business Tools to Their Writing

How Writers Can Apply Business Tools to Their Writing

Author Katherine Quevedo takes an analytical look at the creative process in hopes to help other writers find writing success.