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Story Structure Architect

A Writer's Guide to Building Dramatic Situations & Compelling Characters


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Story Structure Architect
A Writer's Guide to Building Dramatic Situations & Compelling Characters
by Victoria Lynn Schmidt, Ph.D.
Writer's Digest Books, 2005
ISBN 1-58297-325-3
$19.99 paperback, 256 pages

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About the Book
It’s been said that there are no new ideas, but there are proven ideas that have worked again and again for all writers for hundreds of years.

Story Structure Architect is your comprehensive reference to the classic recurring story structures used by every great author throughout the ages. You’ll find master models for characters, plots, and complication motifs, along with guidelines for combining them to create unique short stories, novels, scripts, or plays. You’ll also learn how to:

  • Build compelling stories that don’t get bogged down in the middle
  • Select character journeys and create conflicts
  • Devise sub-plots and plan dramatic situations
  • Develop the supporting characters you need to make your story work

Especially featured are the standard dramatic situations inspired by the Georges Polti’s well-known 19th century work (The Thirty-Six Dramatic Situations). But author Victoria Schmidt puts a 21st century spin on these timeless classics and offers fifty-five situations to inspire your creativity and allow you even more writing freedom. Story Structure Architect will give you the mold and then help you break it.

This browsable and interactive book offers everything you need to craft a complete, original, and satisfying story sure to keep readers hooked!

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