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WD Wants You: Write a Reckless Blitzen, an Angry Santa

Gorilla suits, zombies, The Universe popping up as a character and saying things like, “You’re getting too big for your fangs.” And that’s only one Friday.

For a trip to the wonderful, fun and often enchantingly weird, check out my lunch buddy (and WD Online Community Editor) Brian A. Klems’ #StoryFriday project on Twitter. Basically, Brian posts an opening prompt with our @WritersDigest feed, and then it’s a creative free-for-all as everyone adds lines to a living canvas.

Great literature? Maybe not. A fun, bizarre forum that can take a story—and your mind—in unexpected and delightful directions? Definitely.

Even if you’re one of the last people on Earth (read: me) without a personal Twitter account, it’s a blast to peruse. To participate, when you contribute a line to the story, place #storyfriday at the end of your Tweet—i.e., He was leaving on a jet plane and never coming back. #storyfriday).

To check out a few of the past stories, visit writersdigest.com/storyfriday. For today’s—an epic spawning from the following line—click here.

"Listen Blitzen, I've had it up to about here with your tomfoolery," Santa said as he waved his finger in Blitzen's face.

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WRITING PROMPT: Cheers

Feel free to take the following prompt home or post your response (500 words or fewer, funny, sad or stirring) in the Comments section below. By posting, you’ll be automatically entered in our occasional around-the-office swag drawings.

"… in this drink?"
He shrugs. "There are always more ingredients than you'd ever guess."
I stare into its depths as it reflects candlelight.

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