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Steal from Yourself for Better Book Marketing

By Rob Eagar

When I consult with authors on book marketing issues, a common complaint arises about the need to generate content for free resources, newsletters, and social media pages. The necessity to write new articles, blog posts, or updates gets labeled as a nuisance, because the client thinks it will be difficult to continually come up with new information. However, generating new content doesn't have to be difficult. The easiest way to stay resourceful is by stealing from yourself.

When you steal from yourself, take old material that you've already written and re-purpose it. For instance, take past articles, blog posts, or newsletters and reuse them. Or, modify the original material by putting a new spin on it. Take parts of a book and break it into smaller chunks of content. Turn videos into written articles. Or, take written material and turn it into an audio or video podcast. In addition, steal from interesting experiences in your life to generate new information. For example:

  • Break your non-fiction books into short articles
  • Break your novel into short stories or create back stories.
  • Give sneak peeks into your upcoming manuscripts.
  • Write about the challenges you face as an author.
  • Create Top 10 lists of your favorite books, recipes, movies, etc.

Stealing from other people is illegal and a bad reflection on yourself. However, stealing from yourself is a legitimate way to generate plenty of content and keep your marketing plan on easy street.

About the author:

Rob Eagar is the founder of WildFire Marketing, a consulting practice that helps authors and publishers sell more books and spread their message like wildfire. He has assisted numerous New York Times bestselling authors and his new book, Sell Your Book Like Wildfire, will be published by Writer’s Digest in June, 2012. Find out more about Rob’s advice, products, and coaching services for authors at: www.startawildfire.com

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