Skip to main content

The Value of Writing for Anthologies

An anthology offers many authors’ perspectives and styles on the same theme. It is a book of anticipation and readers’ opportunities filled with a variety of choices, colors, meanings and emotions. In one book readers are offered several authors and their work. Guest column by Elynne Chaplik-Aleskow, founding general manager of WYCC-TV/PBS. She is an author, public speaker, and award-winning educator and broadcaster. Her essays can be found in these upcoming anthologies: This I Believe: On Love(Wiley); Chicken Soup for the Soul Grieving and Recovery (Simon & Schuster); and Thin Threads Anthology – More Real Stories of Life Changing Moments (Kiwi).

My earliest attraction to reading was the short story genre and nonfiction. Nonfiction, be it a short story or essay, liberates both the author and reader within a reality that no other genre can transcend. As the saying goes: “Truth can be stranger than fiction.”

I also have always been drawn to anthologies. An anthology offers many authors’ perspectives and styles on the same theme. It is a book of anticipation and readers’ opportunities filled with a variety of choices, colors, meanings and emotions. In one book readers are offered several authors and their work.

Image placeholder title
Image placeholder title

Guest column by Elynne Chaplik-Aleskow, founding
general manager of WYCC-TV/PBS. She is an author,
public speaker, and award-winning educator and
broadcaster. Her essays can be found in these
upcoming anthologies: This I Believe: On Love
(Wiley); Chicken Soup for the Soul Grieving
and Recovery (Simon & Schuster); and Thin
Threads Anthology – More Real Stories of Life
Changing Moments (Kiwi). See Elynne's website here.

WHY ANTHOLOGIES?

There is a need for anthologies to become a greater mainstream choice of the reading public and reviewers. Anthology authors, editors and publishers must market and inspire reviewers and the public to develop a taste and hunger for quality anthologies.

It is no wonder that, as an author, I have chosen to write nonfiction stories and to be published in anthologies. When I began my professional writing career three years ago, nonfiction was a natural fit for me. I have been blessed to have experienced a life filled with many stories I wish to share. I made the conscious decision that in starting my career as a published author, anthologies would offer me a diverse and potentially larger audience and distribution than having all my stories in one book. As I have built my publishing credits and platform, my own collection of stories is a future consideration.

SUBMIT!

For now, my plan is working well. The publishers and editors of the anthologies my work is published in all promote their books. I am happy to be part of their families with my work exposed to their many audiences. I have also developed my own loyal following based on my published work, my performances of my stories for various organizations and my Public Broadcasting television background.

The anthology market for publication is very competitive. There are very talented writers who are vying for a place in these books. Some anthologies are nonfiction. Others are a combination of fiction, creative nonfiction and poetry. As a reference, some of the books and publishers my work is in are listed here. Check out the publisher’s submission calls. Write and submit!

WHERE TO FIND MY WORK

My work is in three Chicken Soup for the Soul books. The newest out in February is "Grieving and Recovery," with my story “The Red Pen.” The international scope of the Chicken Soup audience is a bonus. This I Believe: On Love (Wiley) is coming out in November with my story “Four Sisters In Life And Death.” This anthology is based on the award winning National Public Radio series. Kiwi, a new and growing east coast publisher, is publishing my story “The Hat” in November in their Thin Threads anthology.

To learn about even more of my stories in included anthologies, visit my website. And good luck submitting!

Image placeholder title

Become a Writer's Digest VIP and
get a sub to the magazine, a sub to
WritersMarket.com and much more.
(A $190
value for $50!)

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 597

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write an "Imagine a World..." poem.

How To Create a Podcast, Develop an Audience, and Get Your Novel Published

How To Create a Podcast, Develop an Audience, and Get Your Novel Published

We’ve discussed podcasting to help promote the book you’ve written—but what about podcasting as a way to tell the story itself? Here, author Liz Keller Whitehurst discusses how the podcast of her novel, Messenger, came to be.

Hunter or Hunted?

Hunter or Hunted?

Every writer needs a little inspiration once in a while. For today's prompt, we're in the middle of a hunt.

Announcing the Get Published in 2022: Breaking In Resource Directory

Announcing the Get Published in 2022: Breaking In Resource Directory

Announcing the Get Published in 2022: Breaking In Resource Directory from Writer's Digest magazine, which includes advice from 41 agents, 39 debut authors, and 27 small presses.

The Idaho Review: Market Spotlight

The Idaho Review: Market Spotlight

For this week's market spotlight, we look at The Idaho Review, a literary journal accepting poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction submissions.

Abbreviation vs. Acronym vs. Initialism (Grammar Rules)

Abbreviation vs. Acronym vs. Initialism (Grammar Rules)

Learn when you're using an abbreviation vs. acronym vs. initialism with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

What Is Investigative Journalism?

What Is Investigative Journalism?

Alison Hill breaks down the definition of investigative journalism, how good investigative journalism makes for sweeping societal change, and how the landscape of the work is evolving.

writer's digest wd presents

WD Presents: 6 WDU Courses, an Upcoming Virtual Conference, and More!

This week, we’re excited to announce six new WDU courses, a romance writing virtual conference, and more!

Going From Me to We: Collaborating on the Writing of a Novel

Going From Me to We: Collaborating on the Writing of a Novel

Past experiences taught bestselling author Alan Russell to tread lightly when it came to collaborating on projects. Here, he discusses how the right person and the right story helped him go from a “me” to a “we.”