New Agency Alert: Arthouse Literary

Reminder: Newer agencies are golden opportunities for new writers because they’re likely building their client list; however, always make sure your work is as perfect as it can be before submitting, and only query agencies that are a great fit for your work. Otherwise, you’re just wasting time and postage. Represents: Nonfiction books, novels, movie scripts.
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Reminder: Newer agencies are golden opportunities for new writers because they’re likely building their client list; however, always make sure your work is as perfect as it can be before submitting, and only query agencies that are a great fit for your work. Otherwise, you’re just wasting time and postage.

Just heard about a new literary/talent agency: Arthouse Literary. I'm waiting for them to reply to a full listing questionnaire. In the meantime, here's what I found out:

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(No address provided.) E-mail: query@arthousetalentandliterary.com; angie@arthousetalentandliterary.com. Web site: www.arthousetalentandliterary.com/. Member Agents: Moreen Littrell, others. Specializes in: "We are most interested in fiction and nonfiction that lends itself to film and TV, and screenplays, which means high concept or character-driven. Voice is key. Genres we like: commercial fiction, women's fiction, narrative nonfiction (memoirs, historical fiction), and young adult."

Represents: Nonfiction books, novels, movie scripts.

How to Contact: Query with SASE. Submit first 15 pages of screenplay/manuscript. Put "Query / (Title)" in the e-mail subject line. Accepts e-mail queries. No fax queries. Responds in 3 months to queries.

Does not want: Westerns, action/adventure, science fiction, apocalyptic epics.

Tips: "We will contact you if we're interested."

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