How I Got My Agent: Debra Ann Pawlak

"How I Got My Agent" is a recurring feature on the GLA blog. Some tales are of long roads and many setbacks, while others are of good luck and quick signings. If you have a literary agent and would be interested in writing a short guest column for this GLA blog, e-mail me at literaryagent@fwmedia.com and we'll talk specifics. Debra Ann Pawlak is the author of Bringing Up Oscar: The Men and Women Who Founded the Academy (Jan. 2011). She writes from southeastern Michigan and has authored a children’s book detailing the life of Bruce Lee. Her work has appeared in Chicken Soup for the Soul, The Writer, Aviation History and Michigan History Magazine.
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"How I Got My Agent" is a recurring feature on the GLA blog. Some tales are of long roads and many setbacks, while others are of good luck and quick signings. To see the previous installments of this column, click here. If you have a literary agent and would be interested in writing a short guest column for this GLA blog, e-mail me at literaryagent@fwmedia.com and we'll talk specifics.

Debra is excited to give away a free book to one random commenter. Comment within one week; winners must live in Canada/US48 to receive the print book by mail. You can win a blog contest even if you've won before. (Update: Elizabeth won.)



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Debra Ann Pawlak is the author of Bringing Up Oscar:
The Men and Women Who Founded the Academy
(Jan. 2011). She writes from southeastern Michigan
and has authored a children’s book detailing the
life of Bruce Lee. Her work has appeared in Chicken
Soup for the Soul, The Writer, Aviation History and
Michigan History Magazine. See the Facebook
page for her book here.


A WONDERFUL HOBBY LOST AND FOUND

Growing up, I had two favorite pastimes—writing stories and watching old movies. I never tired of putting pencil to paper or of sitting in front of the television mesmerized by those glamorous Hollywood legends. As the years rolled by, I put down the pencil to work a full-time job and raise a family, but my fascination with those old movies and the people in them continued. Fast forward a whole lot of years. By 2000, my daughter was in college and my son in high school—both becoming independent a little quicker than I liked. My husband kept busy with his job, but my day job was unfulfilling. Yes, it paid the bills, but a certain restlessness settled deep in my bones. Something was missing. Then one day it hit me—it was that stupid pencil.

"WRITE THIS, NOT THAT"

I started writing again, but instead of a pencil I upgraded to a keyboard and tiptoed out of my comfort zone. I answered an ad in Variety from an editor in Los Angeles. She was developing an online magazine about Hollywood. In my e-mail to her, I suggested a little Hollywood history to round out the current events and, being an old movie buff herself, she loved the idea. That led to a bi-monthly column and my first paying gig.

From there, I built my confidence, took online writing classes and earned a screenwriting certificate. I also moved on to print publications and the darnedest thing happened. I would e-mail an editor with what I thought was a pitch-perfect query and he or she would reply by declining my original idea, but offering an assignment on a totally different subject. In between articles, I wrote two nonfiction books for small presses, but I wanted more.

In late 2008, I developed a book proposal on early Hollywood history and began sending query letters to agents that I thought might be interested. Not wanting anyone to get the impression that I was just a ‘one-book wonder’, my letter concluded by saying I would like to write a second book about the 36 men and women who founded The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Then life unexpectedly threw me a curve.

BEATING THE DEADLINE

In January 2009, the business I’d been employed with since high school offered a buy-out. I agonized over my decision. I’d always wanted to be a full-time writer—maybe this was my opportunity. I accepted their offer, but remained with the company until December 1. At the same time, I gave myself an assignment: find an agent before I left. Faithfully each week, I sent out five query letters. Rejections poured in—some canned, others encouraging.

A few liked my style, but weren’t interested in the subject. Several asked for the entire proposal package, but none offered representation. Then at the end of August, with my self-imposed deadline drawing closer, I checked the website for International Transactions. The agency seemed like a tough nut to crack. Peter and Sandra Riva were not open to fiction writers at the moment. I was a nonfiction writer so I read on. They would only consider nonfiction writers who had been previously published. Small presses or not, I had two books under my belt, so after a moment’s hesitation, I submitted my query.

Two days later, Peter responded. He liked my idea well enough, but what really intrigued him was my book suggestion about the Academy. Out of all the agents I queried, not one ever mentioned the Oscar book. I liked Peter already. I got to work developing a new proposal and once it was finished, I emailed Peter hoping he was still interested. Instead of hitting the ‘reply’ button, he called to say he was. His enthusiasm for early Hollywood matched mine and we just clicked as our conversation covered the era’s endless possibilities. He asked for an exclusive, which was no problem. By the time, I hung up the phone, I didn’t want another agent.

Several weeks later, we spoke again. Peter liked the proposal, but, as always, wanted to kick it up a notch, so he asked for some revisions. I complied and by November 13, (two weeks before my December 1 deadline), I signed on with International Transactions. Three weeks later, Peter sold Bringing Up Oscar, which was published in January, 2011.

I am fortunate to have such a great ally in Peter Riva who shares these interests. As a matter of fact, I could almost see the twinkle in his eyes when, during a phone conversation, he mentioned that his grandmother was one of Hollywood’s most glamorous legends, Marlene Dietrich.

Debra is excited to give away a free book to one random commenter. Comment within one week; winners must live in Canada/US48 to receive the print book by mail. You can win a blog contest even if you've won before. (Update: Elizabeth won.)

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