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Footnotes: 8 Articles on Query Letter Writing

Footnotes is a recurring series on the GLA blog where I pick a subject and provide several interesting articles on said topic. You’ve revised your manuscript to the point where you can’t stand to look at it anymore and now you are ready to tackle the dreaded query letter. Today I’m serving up 8 articles to help you on your way to writing that first-class query letter.

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1. Check out a tank of queries - some good, some not
. Before you do anything, check out Query Shark. Agent Janet Reid slices and dices query letters. Dive into the shark tank if you dare.

2. See the real deal. If you're looking for query letters that were successful in snagging reps, look no further than the site you're on. Chuck collects "Successful Queries" and agents chime in on why they worked.

3. Less is more. Literary Agent Nathan Bransford suggests writing more about your plot and less about you.

4. Voice is in the eye of the beholder.Good writing is often subjective even when
it comes to query letters. Author Allison Brennan’s post proves that.

5. Notes form a published author. Author Therese Walsh dissects the query letter that landed her an agent.


6. Twenty great query tips. At a recent writer’s conference, Literary Agent, Janet Reid dispensed her advice on writing queries. GLA contributor Ricki Schultz shares that advice.

7. Anatomy of a query. More great advice from agent, Nathan Bransford. This time, he looks at the anatomy of a query letter.

8. Need help drafting your pitch? Literary Agent Kristin Nelson has the workshop for you.

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This guest series by writer
Nancy Parish, who runs her
blog, The Sound and Furry.

Want more on this topic?

  • Footnotes: 5 Articles on Writing First Pages.
  • Footnotes: 8 Articles on Revising Your Work.
  • Confused about formatting? Check out Formatting & Submitting Your Manuscript.
  • Read about What Agents Hate: Chapter 1 Pet Peeves.
  • Want the most complete database of agents and what genres they're looking for? Buy the 2011 Guide to Literary Agents today!
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