Footnotes: 5 Articles on Writing Mysteries

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“What I like in a good author is not
what he says, but what he whispers."
~ Logan Pearsall Smith

Footnotes is a recurring series on the GLA
blog where I pick a subject and provide several interesting articles on
said topic. This week, I’m serving up five articles on writing mysteries.

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1. What a girl wants. In an interview on the GLA blog, Agent Stacia Decker discusses what she’s looking for in a mystery, as well as some ins and outs of the genre.

2. Hook ‘em Dano. On the working writers blog, they list 3 ways to make your mystery stand out.

3. Follow the rules. On the About.com fiction writing site, they list 10 rules for writing mysteries.

4. Look at all the angles. On her mystery writing site, Elizabeth Craig discusses how writers can improve an idea.

5. It begins on Page 1. On his blog, mystery writer, Bill Cameron debates the use of a Prologue.

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This guest series by writer
Nancy Parish, who runs her
blog, The Sound and Furry.

Want more on this topic?

  • Footnotes: 5 Articles on Writing First Pages.
  • Footnotes: 8 Articles on Revising Your Work.
  • Confused about formatting? Check out Formatting & Submitting Your Manuscript.
  • Read about What Agents Hate: Chapter 1 Pet Peeves.
  • Want the most complete database of agents and what genres they're looking for? Buy the 2011 Guide to Literary Agents today!
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