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Footnotes: 5 Articles on Romance Writing

"You write to communicate to the hearts and
minds of others what's burning inside you.
And we edit to let the fire show through the smoke."
~Arthur Polotnik

Footnotes is a recurring series on the GLA
blog where I pick a subject and provide several interesting articles on
said topic. This week I’m serving up five articles that focus on writing romance.

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1. Before the loving, bring on the fighting. Heather Massey explores physical fight scenes between characters on Romancing the Blog. Even though the keepers of this blog are on hiatus, you can still mine the archives for great information.

2. No shortcuts here. On her blog, Brenda Coulter de-mystifies the writing life.

3. Molly Blake’s writing tips. On her website, Liz Fielding lists eight writing tips from her popular heroine Molly Blake.

4. She’s not watching television, she’s doing research. Jennifer Crusie lists five things she’s learned about writing romance from watching television.

5. They’re just not that observant. Over at the Free The Princess blog, writer Matthew Delman serves up his opinion on writing romance from the guy’s perspective.

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This guest series by writer
Nancy Parish, who runs her
blog, The Sound and Furry.

Want more on this topic?

  • Footnotes: 5 Articles on Writing First Pages.
  • Footnotes: 8 Articles on Revising Your Work.
  • Confused about formatting? Check out Formatting & Submitting Your Manuscript.
  • Read about What Agents Hate: Chapter 1 Pet Peeves.
  • Want the most complete database of agents and what genres they're looking for? Buy the 2011 Guide to Literary Agents today!
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