8th "Dear Lucky Agent" Contest: Literary Fiction

Author:
Publish date:

This contest is closed as of the end of Sunday,
Jan. 23, 2011. Winners announced in three
weeks or less. Thanks for entering!

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Welcome to the eighth (free!) "Dear Lucky Agent" Contest on the GLA blog. This will be a recurring online contest with agent judges and super-cool prizes. Here's the deal: With every contest, the details are essentially the same, but the niche itself changes—meaning each contest is focused around a specific category or two. So if you're writing a novel that's considered literary fiction, this eighth contest is for you!



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HOW TO SUBMIT

E-mail entries to eighthagentcontest@gmail.com. Please paste everything. No attachments. 

WHAT TO SUBMIT

The first 150-200 words of your unpublished, book-length work of literary fiction. You must include a contact e-mail address with your entry and use your real name. Also, submit the title of the work and a logline (one-sentence description of the work) with your entry.

Please note: To be eligible to submit, I ask that you do one of two things: 1) Mention and link to this contest twice through your social media—blogs, Twitter, Facebook; or 2) just mention this contest once and also add Guide to Literary Agents Blog (www.guidetoliteraryagents.com/blog) to your blogroll.
Please provide link(s) so the judge and I can verify eligibility. Some
previous entrants could not be considered because they skipped this
step!

CONTEST DETAILS

1. This contest will be live for 14 days—from Jan. 9 through the end of Sunday, Jan. 23, 2011, EST. Winners notified by e-mail within three weeks of end of contest. Winners announced on the blog thereafter.
2.To enter, submit the first 150-200 words of your book. Shorter or longer entries will not be considered. Keep it within word count range please.
3.This

contest is solely for completed book-length works of literary fiction. Literary fiction, defined, is fiction that falls outside the categories of genre fiction. Much fiction falls into the so-called popular commercial genres of romance, mystery, suspense, thriller, Western, horror, science fiction, and fantasy. Writing that falls in none of these categories is often called "literary."
4.You can submit as many times as you wish. You can submit even if you submitted to other contests in the past, but please note that past winners cannot win again.
5.The contest is open to everyone of all ages, save those employees, officers and directors of GLA's publisher, F+W Media.
6.By e-mailing your entry, you are submitting an entry for consideration in this contest and thereby agreeing to the terms written here as well as any terms possibly added by me in the "Comments"
section of this blog post. (If you have questions or concerns, write me
personally at literaryagent@fwmedia.com. The Gmail account above is for
submissions, not questions.)

PRIZES!!!

Top 3 winners all get: 1) A critique of the first 10 pages of your
work, by your agent judge (priceless!). 2) A free one-year subscription to WritersMarket.com ($50 value).

MEET YOUR (AWESOME) JUDGE!

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Lindsey Clemons is a literary agent
at Larsen-Pomada Literary Agents in San Francisco.

Awesome books represented by agents at LP Literary Agents include:



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Mad Skills, by Walter Greatshell (Ace; Dec. 2010)

The Scalpel and the Soul: Encounters with Surgery, the Supernatural, and the Healing Power of Hope, by M.D., FACS, Allan J. Hamilton (March 2008, Tarcher)

The Iron King, by Julie Kagawa (Feb. 2010, Harlequin Teen)

Secrets of the Tudor Court, by D.L. Bogdan (Kensington; May 2010)

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