7 Best-Paying Projects for Writers in 2015

If you’ve been daydreaming about making a comfortable living as a writer, 2015 will definitely be the year you make it a reality. There have never been more legitimate freelance opportunities for professional writers than there are right now – especially when the assignments are aimed at helping companies build their businesses.
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Editor’s Note: The following content is provided to Writer’s Digest by a writing community partner. This content is sponsored by American Writers & Artists Inc. www.awaionline.com.

If you’ve been daydreaming about making a comfortable living as a writer, 2015 will definitely be the year you make it a reality.

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There have never been more legitimate freelance opportunities for professional writers than there are right now – especially when the assignments are aimed at helping companies build their businesses.

Marketing forecasts from Ad Age show that marketers are expected to spend $52.8 billion on digital marketing alone in 2014.

And the Direct Marketing Association predicts all direct marketing expenditures will surpass $190 billion per year by 2016.

That’s great news for you as a writer. It means the demand for professional-quality writing is going to skyrocket across all industries – which means companies will expect to pay you a lot more.

But of all the potential paths, seven of them really stand out to us at AWAI

#1: Direct-Response Sales Letters

You simply can’t have a list of writing opportunities that doesn’t include writing promotional letters for the $2.3 trillion direct-response industry.

Ideal writer: Isn’t intimidated by writing a lot of words and can persuade someone to take an action: click, sign up, buy, donate, etc.

  • Fees: $2,000 to $10,000 (and more)
  • Royalties: Possibly 2% to 10% of sales

#2: E-newsletters

E-newsletters provide an inexpensive way for a company to develop a relationship with prospects, and position itself as an industry expert.

Ideal writer: Enjoys researching and learning about new things.

  • Fees: $900 to $2,000 per issue
  • Length: Typically between 1,200 to 1,500 words

#3: Case Studies

Case studies are short “before-and-after” stories that describe how a company solved a challenge with a product or service.

Ideal writer: Storytellers.

  • Fees: $1,250 to $2,000
  • Length: 800 to 1,200 words

#4: Online Content

Businesses use online content to educate their customers and prospects with stories, metaphors and simple advice in the form of new articles, blog posts, emails, and so on.

Ideal writer: Strong interest in a particular area or topic.

  • Fees: $100 to $500 per piece (plus much more if you also develop the content marketing plan)

#5: Social Media

From crafting Facebook posts and tweets to writing engaging LinkedIn articles and replying to comments, social media gives writers a lot of variety.

Ideal writer: Enjoys engaging with readers.

  • Fees: Typically up to $2,000 per month (depending on your involvement)

#6: Emails

The budget for consumer email marketing will be up to $1.1 billion by 2016, adding up to one incredible opportunity to make money as an expert email copywriter.

Ideal writer: An idea machine.

  • Fees: $100 to $1,000 per email
  • Length: 500 to 2,000 words

#7: Video Scripts

A video script is simply a blog that’s meant to be read out loud. By incorporating visuals and voice, companies are able to share information and build an even deeper relationship with their readers.

Ideal writer: Screen writers.

  • Fees: $100-$500 per minute (per page)
  • Length: Most scripts are 3-to-5 minutes long

Make a Living as a Writer in 2015 …

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No matter what opportunity you choose, the most important thing is to do something. The field of opportunity has never been wider — and the demand for quality professional writers like you has never been higher.

And I’m going to help you take full advantage of these opportunities in the coming weeks on this blog – as well as learn how to build a successful writing business, land high-paying assignments, and a whole lot more. So stay tuned!

Rebecca

(Editor’s Note: To learn more about these opportunities, including where to find and land clients, visit www.awaionline.com/top7 today.)

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