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Late Night/Early Morning Sick Poetry

Good evening/morning (depending on your Saturday night party attitude)!

For me, it is early, early morning. I've been attacked by a cold all weekend and am having trouble with that sleeping thing I try to do every night. I took my Nyquil, and I've stayed hydrated--hopefully, soon my eyes will get sleepy from typing this post (fingers crossed).

Anyway, I usually find myself writing weird, nonsensical poetry at this time of the night/morning when I'm sick. In fact, I was guilty of such stuff again just minutes ago. Writers write--even when they're sick.

I'm usually not happy with the writing later on, because sometimes it doesn't even make sense to me. But I think writing while I'm sick helps me get through the illness and still feel semi-productive. I think the writing can even act as a distraction, at times, from the discomfort my body is feeling.

Not sure that I have a point with this post--just sharing some of my experience as a poet.

*****

Also, I don't want to be a tease about the bad stuff I write when I'm up early/late and sick. Though I'll probably regret it later, I'm going to share some of what I've written just minutes earlier. For context, I took my boys to two different festivals Saturday (Ohio is filled with them this time of year). We did hit up the Preble County Pork Festival parade. Woo-hoo!

candy kids collect
scraps from the street
shove them in bags
and accept stickers
from every political
candidate who wants
their parents' votes

candy kids cover
their ears when bands
march through with drums
counting off steps
to the county festival

candy kids covet
time to enjoy
their sweet treasures
and want pop and
balloons and toys
and everything

*****

p.s. As you tear apart the writing above, please keep in mind that it is only a draft. Also, I'm sick and medicated.

*****

p.p.s. Hope everyone's sleeping better than me! :)

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