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Congrats, C.C.-- A Pitch Workshop Success Story!!

Hey, all--

Just wanted to post a great email I recently received from C.C., a loyal reader who submitted the logline and synopsis for her TV idea to the Script Notes Pitch Workshop last December. Here's what CC writes...

Hi Chad,

A few months ago I submitted a synopsis for a show called "Sarah Weekly" to your pitch workshop. Well, i went ahead and wrote the pilot and now I'm a quarter finalist in my first screenwriting competition (the 2009 Page International Screenwriting Awards). Granted, i'm a far cry from being "the next big thing," but what it really represents in the first time something I've written has been read by people who are not blood relatives. so far, so good.

Anyway, i was hoping you'd post this email on your blog for two reasons: 1) I want to thank you and your readers for your feedback and support. It's greatly appreciated, and 2) I want to encourage other aspiring writers to write, write, write. Get those ideas down on paper. Show them to people. There is such a feeling of accomplishment that comes from executing your idea and having a finished script in your hands. Don't deny yourself that feeling.

thx again,
cc.

So first of all... CONGRATULATIONS, CC!!! I am so excited and proud for you... this is awesome! And your message to other writers is heard loud and clear... in fact, while being a finalist in the screenwriting competition is AMAZING, and a true validation of your talent, it's a huge triumph just to have written something! That already puts you ahead of 90% of the competition, because most of us never have the courage or energy to get around to actually WRITING the great ideas we have!

I can speak for myself when I say I have a million brilliant (I think) ideas floating around in my head... and the only thing keeping them from being great scripts is-- honestly-- MYSELF. For whatever reason-- and I think of a lot of them-- I always have an excuse NOT TO WRITE. I'm too busy. Not inspired. Need to think longer about the idea. Have to go to the grocery store. Blah blah blah. But the truth is...

As writers, the most important thing is to WRITE. In fact, if we're NOT constantly writing, we're not-- by the very definition of the word-- WRITERS.

So major kudos to you... not only for being a finalist, but for being truly and unequivocally-- A WRITER. Whether you win this contest, sell the script, become a multi-million dollar showrunner, or a best-selling novelist, you are already what most people only think they are: A WRITER.

Please keep us in the loop and let us know what happens with your pilot!

In the mean time, folks-- we'll have more Pitch Workshop submissions coming up (David-- you're on deck)... plus, some great book reviews, reader questions, and more!

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