16 Blogging Tips For Writing Fresh Content & Attracting Readers

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If you already write a blog or are thinking of creating one, you'll need to know how to attract and keep your readers interested. Today's tip comes from Christina Katz's book Get Known Before the Book Deal. Use these tips to help you write fresh content that lures your readers back for more:

Get Published With an Author's Platform | Get Known Before the Book Deal by Christina Katz
  1. Keep your content fresh. Don’t blog about what everyone else is blogging about. Respond to a buzz topic with your fresh perspective, drawing on your expertise. Give folks something to think about that they won’t find anywhere else.
  2. Avoid politics, religion, or anything that might offend your readers, if none of these are your expertise. (Learned this the hard way.)
  3. One more time with emotion: Consider what your audience cares deeply about and revisit those topics often. Encourage, inspire, cajole.
  4. Use reporting techniques. Can you back that up with a fact? Then go ahead. Trends, statistics, news, and current events are all more interesting with a few facts sprinkled in.
  5. Demystify whenever possible. The tip and list forms work well for this.
  6. Offer round-ups of your best previous posts.
  7. Optimize your blog. Use feeds that allow folks to subscribe. Include links to subscribe to any newsletters you offer.
  8. Create a relevant and enticing list of related blogs (blogroll). Visit those blogs regularly and leave comments.
  9. Think community. If your blog seems to be just you talking to you, people will not be inclined to stay. Think we.
  10. Post rhythmically. Your readers don’t want to come back every day if you are only going to post every other day. Always post consistently.
  11. Avoid blogging burnout by utilizing guest bloggers and co-bloggers, but don’t disappear if your audience came to hear you.
  12. Be visual. Add quality photos, videos, and podcasts. Remember that you are producing your own “show.” What would you come back for?
  13. Hit the high notes. When good things happen, share them. This keeps your blog emotionally compelling and fun.
  14. Write short and punchy. Then spell check.
  15. Make recommendations. Write top-ten lists. Share books and quotes you like. Be a filter for folks who want more on your topic.
  16. Write longer posts in serial fashion (for example, one tip per day for a certain number of days). People will return to catch your next point.

Click here for a free download on How to Start a Blog and Turn It Into a Book.

Buy Get Known Before the Book Deal now!

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