Ghostwriting: A Checklist of Questions to Ask Potential Clients

Before you say yes to a ghostwriting gig, or even make a bid, you must know all you can about the project in question. Here's a checklist of questions that you should consider asking potential clients.
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Before you say yes to a ghostwriting gig, or even make a bid, you must know all you can about the project in question. Here's a checklist of questions that ghostwriting expert Kelly James-Enger says you should consider asking potential clients:

ghostwriting checklist

What kind of book do you want to write?

Why do you want to write this book?

Have you started writing already? Do you have any material or chapters for me to use?

What’s your time frame? When do you want the book in print?

Why do you want a ghostwriter or co-author for your book? And which would you prefer?

What kind of publisher do you hope to be working with? Do you want to sell your book to a traditional publisher, or self-publish it with a print-on-demand service?

Who’s the audience for your book? Why will they want to read it?

Have you thought about how you’d like to work with a writer?

What’s your budget for this project? (You may have to explain that ghostsare paid up front and don’t work solely for a “share of the royalties” or other future income.)

During this conversation, take careful notes and consider whether or not you’re interested in the project. Does the person sound like someone you can work with? Is the subject something you can write about? Listen to your gut—it’ll often tell you what to do.

For more on ghostwriting, check out Kelly James-Enger's article:
How to Be a Successful Ghostwriter

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