Basic Writing Principles Across All Media

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Last week, I mentioned that I was prepping for a class on timeless writing principles for my students who are majoring in e-media. Today during class, I opened up the question to my knowledge network on Twitter, and received some excellent feedback.

[I've bolded the ones that I had in my actual presentation before opening the question up to Twitter!]

Always, always, always consider your audience.
@LaurieBoris

Make sure the rhythm is right. Good writing grooves like good music :-)
@jackiesface

Less is more, especially when it comes to modifiers. If you modify everything, then you modify nothing.
@KristenLambTX

Yes--Study Marshall McLuhan. The medium is, indeed, the message.
@Deffree

Read your work out loud. Holds true for fiction, blogs, articles, everything. If it sounds wrong out loud, it needs editing.
@kimswitzer

Don't use the qualifier 'very.'
@geoffrey_little

One that gives me the most trouble - Write now, rewrite later. Don't try to do both at the same time.
@1stine

If an adjective or adverb adds no higher value to the sentence, get rid of it.
@lightherlamp

Less is best. Be concise.
@DJordanLane

My rule - know your audience.
@MaestroDSCH

Try second person in article or blog ledes.
@DavidRutsala

"Be specific." Vague sentences don't work when you're limited by time. You can't be James Joyce on social media.
@Veronica_Jarski

No secret - describe w/verbs. "He dashed out the door." Not "He ran quickly out the door."
@Gary_at_PROSOCO

My Fav !! Keep the sentences short
@cothrust

Tell the truth. Or go into advertising.
@Ditchwalk

Give your characters depth; emotion, struggles, challenges, reasons, bring them to life. Quality before quantity.
@BuddhistKnight

Expect re-writes and edits, they're not a negative, they're an essential. Go back, make it better when ideas call
@BuddhistKnight

If you lack motivation; set yourself a minimum of say one quality page a day, it releases pressure, then expand.
@BuddhistKnight

The five paragraph essay. Never fails me.
@booksquare

Get who vs whom right, and don't confuse bring with take; then make each sentence so beautiful that I wish I had written it.
@askjohnabout

Plus, if it doesn't sound like something you would actually SAY, then it probably won't seem very authentic. Use your voice.
@askjohnabout

Keep cutting until you get message across with lowest possible word count. Simplicity is an art!
@BucksWriter

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