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Discounted TV Classes

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Hey, everyone--

I'm teaching some upcoming TV and writing classes for Mediabistro, and the folks there generously said I could offer discounts to any interested blog readers. Here's info on two classes-- a 3-hr seminar on writing TV pilots and a 10-week class on writing a TV spec script-- ane more are coming shortly. If you're interested, sign up soon... they can fill up quickly!

WRITING THE TV PILOT: Create & Develop Your Own Series
When: Monday, December 10, 7-10 pm
Where: mediabistro.com, 7494 Santa Monica Blvd., Ste. 303, W. Hollywood, CA 90046
Cost: Originally $65, but tell them you saw the blog, and you get a $15 discount... only $50
To sign up: Call Stefanie at 310-659-5668
For more information:Click here, or read on below...

WRITING THE TV SPEC SCRIPT: Complete a Draft of a Sitcom or Drama
When:
10 weeks, Wednesdays, January 16 - March 19, 7-10 pm
Where:
mediabistro.com, 7494 Santa Monica Blvd., Ste. 303, W. Hollywood, CA 90046
Cost: Originally $610, but tell them you saw the blog, and you get a $75 discount... only $535
To sign up: Call Stefanie at 310-659-5668
For more information:Click here, or read on below...

A bit more about each class...

WRITING THE TV PILOT: Create & Develop Your Own Series
Now that Friends, Frasier, and Sex and the City are off the air, networks are looking for the next great new show. And with so many cable networks actively seeking original programming, the time has never been better to develop and pitch your own series idea. This seminar will show you how to develop and write a pilot, detail what to include in a proposal, and discuss the elements of the perfect pitch. In this class, students will learn:
• Which types of shows the networks are looking for
• Where to pitch and who to pitch to
• How to write a synopsis that captures producers' attention
• How to create compelling characters
• How to generate ideas for a season's worth of episodes
• What to include in your pitch—and what to leave out
• How to write a saleable pilot

WRITING THE TV SPEC SCRIPT: Complete a Draft of a Sitcom or Drama
You want to write for TV, and you've mastered the basics of meeting deadlines, mastering wordcount, and editing. Now you're ready to get your script off the gorund. In this class, you'll start and finish the first draft of your sitcom or one-hour drama spec script. Each week, you will bring in the amount of pages for your spec script that your instructor requires. Each student will read his or her work (with the help of fellow "actors" in the class), and the teacher and students will take turns critiquing the piece while adding suggestions for making it tighter. The entire last class will be devoted to reading final drafts and learning how to get your script into the right hands. Class is also heavy on TV clips and sample scripts.

In this class, you can expect to learn:
• Everything there is to know about the TV business from an industry expert
• The rules for creating characters that are true
• Structure: How to "break for commercial," find a good ending, wrap things up seamlessly
• The secret behind perfect dialogue
• Subplots: Where to put them, how to tie them in

By the end of class, students can expect to have:
A complete spec script of a one-hour drama or sitcom.

Admission requirements:
Please submit a letter of interest (including a brief work history), and a writing sample (less than 2,000 words).

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