2016 Writer’s Digest Poetry Award Winners

Writer’s Digest would like to congratulate the 25 winners in the 2016 WD Poetry Awards!
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Writer’s Digest would like to congratulate the winners of the 2016 Poetry Awards, where writers submit their very best poetry of less than 32 lines. Please join us in congratulating our winners!

For full coverage of the 2016 WD Poetry Awards, check out the July/August 2017 issue of Writer’s Digest. To read the top ten poems, click here.

  1. “This” by Jamison Cole McLean
  2. “How to Destroy a Village without using an Exploding Donkey” by Simon Walsh
  3. “A Long Marriage” by Suellen Wedmore
  4. “Always Look” by Christian Schoon
  5. “Counterpoint for Ella” by Susan Gunter
  6. “Heartthrob” by Kate Hutchinson
  7. “Sonnet for a Certain Thursday” by Heather Wood
  8. “Dmitry Meets Feozva” by Kelly DeMaegd
  9. “Words” by Brian Kirchner
  10. “Sphere for Blue Coffee” by Alexej Savreux
  11. “Just This Once, Just This Much” by Judith Sornberger
  12. “An Insignificant Woman” by Naomi Brown
  13. “Aired Out” by Johne Richardson
  14. “Kleetchy” by Jack Shakely
  15. “Crash” by Karen Stone
  16. “About the River” by Harvey Soss
  17. “Crash in Sisters” by Irene Cooper
  18. “Casket Pretty” by Olivia Caldwell
  19. “Labor Day” by Heidi Dezember
  20. “Habit” by Johne Richardson
  21. “Dad” by Jayne Jenner
  22. “Poulsbohemian Poetry Reading” by Carol Despeaux Fawcett
  23. “Midnight Walk” by Laurie Holding
  24. “Sorrow” by Elizabeth DeSchryver
  25. “The Ambulance Next Door” by Doug Wilkinson
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