Writing Editor Blogs

The Writer’s Dig
by Jess Zafarris
Content Strategist Jess Zafarris covers everything about writing on this blog. From grammar to writing tips to publishing advice to best practices in finding an agent to fueling your creative fire, she’s got you covered by pulling in great tips (not just from herself but from from other published and award-winning authors, too). Check out her advice—your writing career will thank you. Read The Writer’s Dig


Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by the editors of Writer’s Digest
The GLA blog keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read the Guide to Literary Agents Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest
Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer
Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 434

Welcome back to the Wednesday Poetry Prompts! I hope you enjoyed April as much as I did, but now, we can get back to a bit more leisurely poetic pace. For today’s prompt, write a project poem. There are so many possible projects: write a book; plant a garden; train for...

5 Tips for Writing About Politics in Fiction

Politics can be a contentious topic to address in any scenario these days—but that doesn't mean you should avoid including politics in fiction if the story warrants it. Here, Aimee Agresti offers her best tips for writing about politics in a novel.

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 30

Here we are again: the end of another challenge. Thank you so much for showing up and poeming along with me. It’s always a great deal of fun. For today’s prompt, write a closing time poem. Or another way of coming at this prompt is to write a poem in which...

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 29

For today’s prompt, write a response poem. Respond to whatever helps you get your poem written, but my thought is that you should respond to one of your poems from earlier in this challenge. For instance, my example below responds to my Day 1 poem. ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t...

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 28

For today’s prompt, take the phrase “(blank) Wave,” replace the blank with a word or phrase, make the new phrase the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Possible titles include: “Tidal Wave,” “Next Wave,” “Friendly Wave,” “Heat Wave,” and/or “Sound Wave.” ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t have...

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 27

For today’s prompt, write a story poem. Think of a story, could be a long, complicated, winding story, but for a poem, it may make more sense to make it a short, direct story. ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the...

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 26

Happy Poem in Your Pocket Day! For today’s prompt, write a relationship poem. Of course, there are human relationships, but there are also plant-animal relationships, animal-animal relationships, and even mathematical relationships. Good, bad, healthy, and not-so-much. Dive deep today. ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that...

21 Ways to Pivot Your Plot

You can write a great character sketch, a moving love scene, a thrilling chase, even a heart-clutching murder—but a good story needs more than those elements. It needs plot movement—articulated by pivot points.

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 25

For today’s prompt, pick an intriguing and/or seldom-used word, make it the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. If you have a limited vocabulary, try out brabble, dandle, feracious, impavid, lippitude, or vulgus. Or pick up a dictionary or thesaurus. ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t have to...

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 24

Closing in on the finish line of another April Poem-A-Day Challenge, so today I’m upping the stakes for anyone who wants an extra challenge! For today’s Two-for-Tuesday prompt: Write a roundelay. Guidelines here. Or… Write an anti-form poem. ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should...

Leveling Up as a Writer with Peer Critique

Not all practice makes perfect. A writer who works in isolation will not improve significantly over time. Leveling up requires stepping outside of your comfort zone. Here's how your can do that through peer critique of your work.

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 23

For today’s prompt, write an action poem. So many actions are available to the poet: singing, running, clapping, working, and–umm–poeming. Yes, there’s a world of possibility today–all ready to act. ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing the...

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 22

For today’s prompt, pick a plant, make it the title of your poem, and then, write your poem. Pick a favorite vegetable or fruit, a flower, a tree, even a shrubbery. ***** Re-create Your Poetry! Revision doesn’t have to be a chore–something that should be done after the excitement of composing...

2018 April PAD Challenge: Day 21

For today’s prompt, write a danger poem. There are various levels of danger out there–from physical danger to the danger of being discovered doing something you shouldn’t (or doing something that might embarrass you–or someone else). Even the act of writing and sharing a poem brings with it the potential for...