Writing Editor Blogs

The Writer’s Dig
by Brian A. Klems
Online Editor Brian A. Klems covers everything about writing on his blog. From grammar to writing tips to publishing advice to best practices in finding an agent to fueling your creative fire, he’s got you covered by pulling in great tips (not just from himself but from from other published and award-winning authors, too). Check out his advice—your writing career will thank you. Read Brian’s Blog


Guide to Literary Agents Blog
by Cris Freese
The GLA blog keeps track of all news related to literary agents and writing conferences. Common features include agent interviews, new agency listings, agency profiles, upcoming conferences of interest, contests and other publishing opportunities, valuable writing resources, submission tips and information, and a blogroll of other agent blogs. Read the Guide to Literary Agents Blog


There Are No Rules
by the editors of Writer’s Digest
Get on the cutting edge of today’s publishing trends and how authors can succeed in a world of fast-paced technological change, guided by the editors of Writer’s Digest. You’ll get an inside look at the work, play, and passion of the publishing business and find practical tools for success. Read There Are No Rules


Poetic Asides
by Robert Brewer
Published poet Robert Lee Brewer blogs on issues affecting poets from the poet’s perspective. As the editor of Writer’s Market, Brewer also shares insights on the publishing industry, especially as it relates to poetry and the poetry markets. He also explains poetic forms, interviews other published poets, and provides the occasional poetry prompt. Read Robert’s Blog


The Great Debate: To Prologue or Not to Prologue?

As many of you know, book publishing industry professionals and readers alike have openly expressed their dislike of prologues. Act first, explain later. Great advice from James Scott Bell. Be careful with backstory and prologues. #writetip — Nat Russo (@NatRusso) September 30, 2017 Yes! Prologues don't work all the time, do...

Launching Into Scenes with Action

All great novels and stories start out with a mere idea. Maybe it’s a large idea that spans centuries and crosses continents, like Patrick Rothfuss’s first book in The Kingkiller Chronicles series, The Name of the Wind; or maybe it’s magic realism manifest into stories, like Aimee Bender’s books. No matter...

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 415

For today’s prompt, write an I Believe You poem. This could be a poem about someone’s vision for the future or someone’s story of the past. It could be a poem about a real person, a fictional character, or even yourself (written in the first person by someone else–or a “staring...

Why I Write Poetry: Marie Elena Good

A few months ago, I posted about “Why I Write Poetry” and encouraged others to share their thoughts, stories, and experiences for future guest posts. I’ve already received so many, and I hope they keep coming in (details on how to contribute below). Thank you! Today’s “Why I Write Poetry” post...

Marketing & Sales Perspectives for Indie Authors

I’ve considered myself a professional writer for a little over three years now, and I’ve learned a great deal about the publishing industry in that time. Much of how I think and what I do as an independently published author parallels the experiences of my traditionally published friends, but there are...

An Affective Singularity

Today’s guest post, an affective singularity, comes from Nate Pritts, who shared why he writes poetry back in July (click here to read). Nate Pritts is the Director and Founding Editor of H_NGM_N (2001), an independent publishing house that started as a mimeograph ‘zine, and the author of eight books of...

Why We Write

The Prompt: This week's writing prompt is a little bit different than usual. Instead of telling us a fictional tale, we'd like to hear the why behind your love of writing. Share in the comments—in under 500 words—the reason behind your love of writing. Your response could appear in the February 2018...

New Literary Agent Alert: Lexi Wangler of Massie & McQuilkin

Reminder: New literary agents (with this spotlight featuring Lexi Wangler of Massie & McQuilkin) are golden opportunities for new writers because each one is a literary agent who is likely building his or her client list. About Lexi: Lexi Wangler is a junior agent and foreign rights associate at Massie &...

Weekly Round-Up: A Very Good Place to Start

Every week our editors publish around 10 blog posts—but it can be hard to keep up amidst the busyness of everyday life. To make sure you never miss another post, we’ve created a new weekly round-up series. Each Saturday, find the previous week’s posts all in one place. Mostly Harmless To...

The ABCs of Story: Plots, Subplots, and Sub-Subplots

The arrangement of a narrative is often singular in its focus: It details the peaks and valleys, dips and pivots, of a single story. But a single story needn’t be such a direct thrust. Imagine the metaphor of a roller coaster, but now weave in another roller coaster—perhaps even two rides...

Why I Write Poetry: Bruce W. Niedt

A few months ago, I posted about “Why I Write Poetry” and encouraged others to share their thoughts, stories, and experiences for future guest posts. I’ve already received so many, and I hope they keep coming in (details on how to contribute below). Thank you! Today’s “Why I Write Poetry” post...

How I Got My Agent: Julia Walton

When I graduated from college in 2007, the economy tanked and it was viewed as unwise to seriously pursue any artistic endeavors. My family was thrilled that I had managed to secure a stable job in uncertain times and even though my heart was broken at the thought of working at...

Debut Authors Tell All: Ellie Terry, Middle-Grade Novelist

Every year the editor of Children’s Writer’s & Illustrator’s Market compiles a handful of debut authors with unique stories to feature in the latest edition. In my first year as editor, I interviewed 21 debut authors for the 2018 book. And while you’ll have to pick up the latest copy of...

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 414

For today’s prompt, write a connection poem. The poem could be about a physical connection, like holding hands or building a bridge across a river. Or it could be about social connections, like at a party or online. Of course, there are also electrical connections, magnetic connections, associative connections, and so...

Weekly Round-Up: Writing With Friends

Every week our editors publish around 10 blog posts—but it can be hard to keep up amidst the busyness of everyday life. To make sure you never miss another post, we’ve created a new weekly round-up series. Each Saturday, find the previous week’s posts all in one place. The Writing Life...

The Pros & Cons of Working with a Small Publisher

As a new author or even if you have one or two books under your self-publishing belt, you may be thinking of entering the traditional publishing arena. I’ve been there and have had my share of rejections from the larger well-known publishing houses. But, I didn’t let that discourage me …...

7 Things I’ve Learned So Far, by Melissa Fraterrigo

“7 Things I’ve Learned So Far” (this installment written by Melissa Fraterrigo, author of GLORY DAYS) is a recurring column where writers at any stage of their career can talk about writing advice and instruction, as well as how they got their literary agent—by sharing seven things they’ve learned along their...

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 413

For today’s prompt, write a recognition poem. A recognition poem could be about public recognition, like an award or a declaration in front of or directed to a group of people. Or it could be about recognizing something for the first time–like an epiphany. Or recognizing a person, place, or thing...

8 Ways to Rock Random Acts of Poetry Day!

Tomorrow is the first Wednesday of October, and that can only mean one thing: It’s Random Acts of Poetry Day! Let me share a story: As I was approaching the lecture hall for a round table on poetry with other poets, a woman approached me with a baggie full of chalk....