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Your Story 64: Winners!

Photo by Lindsay Hiatt Photography (lindsayhiattphotography.com)

Prompt: Write the opening sentence (25 words or fewer) to a story based on the photo to the left.

Thanks to everyone who entered and/or voted in WD’s Your Story #64! Here are the results.

The winners, in ranking order, are as follows:

1. As the winter wind whipped against the worn cedar plank shingles of the 100-year old log cabin, temptation and fear began crippling the inside.

2. Our story died like it had lived—behind two-way mirrors and clouded glass, like old ghosts that stare from empty windows.

3. Grandma slept in a dark and dusty attic every night for seven years, four months, and three weeks until the law showed up last Saturday.

4. Her window, like a petulant child, refused my hungry eyes a glimpse inside, reflecting instead the cold, lonely landscape to which I was banished.

5. Delicate curtains and a lone cypress mirrored in tempered glass hid a life more splintered than the shingles clinging to the cabin in the glade.

6. Grandpa said he didn’t recognize the .35 Remington we found under the floorboards in Lissie’s room.

7. Becca had finally returned to Grandma's cabin – once considered a haven – where her parents had nearly killed her nearly 14 years before.

8. The Necromancer chanted seven times, one spell for each child, until even the second story window was invisible to the murderous horde below.

9. It looked like a simple house, but the device contained within would change the world forever.

10. After my brothers and I left that old creaking house, our empty rooms amplified my mother's footsteps as she nervously paced the halls.

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