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Your Story 61: Winners!

Prompt: Write the opening sentence, of 25 words or fewer, to a story based on the photo to the left.

Prompt: Write the opening sentence (just one, of 25 words or fewer) to a story based on the photo to the left.

Falling-Up

Thanks to everyone who entered and/or voted in WD’s Your Story 61! Here are the results. The winners, in ranking order, are as follows:

1. Billy had promised Amy he’d jump right behind her, but then the lights were so beautiful, and he was so tired. (Tina Mortimer)

2. As I lay stranded outside the Gates of Heaven, I wished I had been told of the “No Shirt, No Service” policy. (Alison Reeger Cook)

3. After his second night sleeping on Ms. Darling’s balcony, the young boy told her his secret: he had lost the second star to the right. (Sarah Allen)

4. Most girls dream of finding a beautiful half-naked boy asleep on their balcony, but only because they don’t know how dangerous angels can be. (Michael Boettcher)

5. Crawling into a bed made for two felt like lying, or an echo of a happier memory, so I slept with streetlights and stars. (Jaime Lin)

6. It is universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of meager fortune is more in need of a place to sleep than a wife. (Brian Corcoran)

7. Funny how, when drunk enough, the city lights always call to mind the blinking Christmas lights my mother hung every year and my father hated. (Marcia LeVan)

8. When the bright lights picked up the victim’s feet twisted in the infinity symbol, I knew the unsub had struck again. (Melissa Raine)

9. When Peter felt the heat of the searchlight, he assumed it was another helicopter passing overhead—until suddenly, he felt his body begin to rise. (Bennett Converse)

10. Since becoming a vampire, John often bathed in the light of the Intimate Pleasures billboard, which was sadly the brightest light in the city. (Karly Mareka)

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