Your Story 40 - Winners!

Prompt: Write the opening sentence to a story (25 words or fewer) based on the photo prompt to the left.
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Prompt: Write the opening sentence to a story (25 words or fewer) based on the photo prompt to the left.
Official Rules

Thanks to everyone who voted on WD's Your Story #40! Here are the results. The winning entries, in ranking order, are as follows:

1. He snatched up a lost wallet on the sidewalk, thinking it was his lucky day--until he read the note stuck inside: Look behind you. (Darlene Roberts)

2. It was a terrible coincidence when the wallet he found on the sidewalk contained a faded picture of his missing wife. (Kara Branson)

3. That wallet on the sidewalk meant opportunity or trouble, and I was up for either one. (Sandra Dowling)

4. Bending down to collect his wallet off the pavement, Jerry’s mind turned to something else: the long split down the back of his trousers. (Natasha Long)

5. As Edward watched the wallet fall to the ground, his initial reaction was to return it, but his addictions would outweigh his guilt. (Richard De Fino)

6. Jacob’s world stopped when he opened the lost wallet and saw a picture of his wife with a man he’d never seen before. (Lari Newton)

7. When I found a tan leather wallet sunbathing on an empty concrete lane, it felt hot like a thousand sins. (Andrew Cloward)

8. Darren told me to forget the wallet and keep running, but the faded picture was worth the risk. (Drew Iverson)

9. It wasn’t even time for breakfast yet, and Frank was already learning that he should’ve watched the news report on man-eating wallets. (Michael Pizzano)

10. Swooping down to pick up the wallet, she hoped there was at least enough money in it to continue the electrolysis on her hairy forearms. (Ken Mosier)

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