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Your Story #104: Winners

Write the opening line to a story based on the photo prompt above. You can be poignant, funny, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story.
 Image from Getty

Image from Getty

  • Prompt: Write the opening line to a story based on the photo prompt above. You can be poignant, funny, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story.

Email your submission to yourstorycontest@aimmedia.com with the subject line “Your Story #104.” No attachments, please.

Unfortunately, we cannot respond to every entry we receive, due to volume. No confirmation emails will be sent out to confirm receipt of submission. But be assured all submissions received before entry deadline are considered carefully. Official Rules

Entry Deadline: CLOSED

Out of 250 entries, WD editors and readers selected the following 10 winners, which will be published in the September/October 2020 issue of Writer's Digest.

1. When Defbeijklas hijacked this human body, he thought it would be inconspicuous to wear the black and white box the humans stared so fondly at.   —Janell Lim

2.

The shattered cathode-ray tube currently lodged into my jugular vein keeps me both alive and dead, famous and infamous.

    —Greg Bauch

3.

Still onstage with the magician, I screamed for help, but the only sound that emerged from my mouth was static.

    —V.P. Villalobos

4.

He wondered if the punishment fit the crime of excessive viewing.

    —Sara McNulty

5.

Tom had read that to properly repair a television set, you must understand how it works, inside out.

    —Ken Brodeen

6.

It was not the best hiding spot, but it would have to do; fortunately, Ronald had three semesters of improv and a misplaced remote control working in his favor.

    —Laura Buchwald

7.

There was nothing Mr. Grant wouldn’t do to get the attention of his students.

    —Judy Salcewicz

8.

As an actor and voice talent, I looked a long time for an image that would fit with the motto on my business card: “TV or not TV?” 

    —Richard Westring

9.

David chose to be alone when he contacted Galactic headquarters, partially for operational security, but mainly because of how dorky he felt using the gear. 

    —Michael Hamer

10.

During the divorce proceedings I knew that Chris was serious about keeping the television, but I just didn’t realize how serious. 

    —David Minor

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