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Your Story #102: Winners

Write the opening line to a story based on the photo prompt above. You can be poignant, funny, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story.
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  • Prompt: Write the opening line to a story based on the photo prompt above. You can be poignant, funny, witty, etc.; it is, after all, your story.

Out of 300 entries, WD editors and readers chose the following 10 winners.

1. The balancing spoon game was fun until a spoon floated in the air by itself at the empty table spot.

— Ryan Pecukonis

 2. Viv was the first in her coven to master the spoon trick but wasn’t sure how to wiggle her nose to cast the removal spell.

— Yvonne Glasgow 

3. You see, if you start with the spoon trick and follow with the fork trick, then they’ll never see the knife trick coming.

— Alix Sharpe

4. Ensconced in a pretentious lair and camouflaged among imposters, Roseate Spoonbill surrendered without incident, but not without deceit.

—Patti M. Walsh

5. Janey raised her hands as the masked gunman demanded, her terror somewhat mitigated by the absurdity of her situation.

— Brandie June

6. No matter how far Cassandra pushed the limits of their gullibility, her seance guests continued to submit willingly to her outrageous requests.

—Mel Lewis

7. I was exceedingly apprehensive that my plastic surgery fellowship wasn’t teaching the most up-to-date techniques in the art of rhinoplasty.

— Scott B. Blanke

8.  Loretta’s natural magnetism gave her an unfair advantage at dinner party games.

— Andrea R. Huelsenbeck

9. “Engineering broke the dining subroutine again,” the cyberneticist muttered as he watched the androids eschew dinnertime banter in favor of balancing spoons on their noses.

—Chris Puzak

10. William regretted being too cocky about his intelligence, for he never suspected that the cutlery advertisement he auditioned for was actually a psychology experiment.

—Thee Sim Ling

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