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WD Poetic Form Challenge: Huitain Winner

Learn the winner and Top 10 list for the Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the huitain.

Here are the results of the Writer’s Digest Poetic Form Challenge for the huitain along with a Top 10 list. (Hopefully, we'll open up the next challenge next Monday.)

Usually, I would link back to the original post to read all the original poems, but we can't do that for this challenge. However, feel free to share your huitains in the comments below.

Here is the winning huitain:

"Cody at the Leaf Blower," by Jane Shlensky

I watch a game that's underway
beside the woods, across the lawn,
as Cody faces winds at play—
a kind of keep-away at dawn.
He revs his blower, hefts its brawn,
betting on tough technologies.
Wind scatters leaves as if they're sown,
takes Cody's hat, quick as you please.

*****

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*****

Congratulations, Jane! In a wild year, this is a fun and grounding poem.

Here’s my Top 10 list:

  1. Cody at the Leaf Blower, by Jane Shlensky
  2. A Koala Cries, by Tracy Davidson
  3. I want to stay up late at night, by Riley Hysell
  4. Scintillation in April, by William Preston
  5. Photo Album, by Sasha A. Palmer
  6. Winter Pruning, by casplan
  7. Cathedral Fire, by Nancy Posey
  8. Spider Dance, by Taylor Graham
  9. Night Train, by Walter J. Wojtanik
  10. Winter Blues, by Lisa L. Stead

Congratulations to everyone in the Top 10! And to everyone who wrote a huitain!

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