WD Poetic Form Challenge: Erasure Winner

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For the erasure poetic form challenge, there were fewer entries than usual, which was not entirely surprising. As such, I selected a winner and Top 5 list.

The winning entry is "a chatter of tongues," by Tracy Davidson, which used Emily Bronte's Wuthering Heights as a source.

"a chatter of tongues," by Tracy Davidson

a chatter of tongues
clatter of copper saucepans
and silver tankards
laden with legs of mutton
a couple of horse-pistols

a dark-skinned gypsy
an erect handsome figure
with vexatious phlegm

first feathery flakes
shiver through every limb
heap of dead rabbits
in one bitter whirl of wind
discovered dead in a bog

what vain weather-cocks
we of social intercourse
regular gossip
with a fist on either knee
a saw-edge hard as whinstone

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Congratulations, Tracy!

Here's the complete Top Five list:

  1. "a chatter of tongues," by Tracy Davidson [source : Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte]
  2. "Just Clay," by Taylor Graham [source : "A Scroll of Infinities," by Katy Brown]
  3. "DEAR," by Laurie Kolp [source : Wuthering Heights, by Emily Bronte]
  4. "The Sounds of Malverne in the 1930s," by Barb Peters [source : Bob Mackreth posted an essay by his father on Facebook, 01 Dec 2014]
  5. "Chubble, Chubble, Chubble <3," by Micah P. Hawkinson [source : comments on Taylor Swift video on YouTube]

Congrats to everyone in the Top 5 list! And to everyone who tried out erasure!

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Robert Lee Brewer is Senior Content Editor of the Writer's Digest Writing Community and author of the poetry collection, Solving the World's Problems. In addition to managing this blog, he edits Writer's Market and Poet's Market, writes a poetry column for Writer's Digest magazine, leads online education, speaks at events around the country, and lots of other fun writing-related stuff.

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He's married to the poet Tammy Foster Brewer, who helps him keep track of their five little poets.

Follow him on Twitter @robertleebrewer.

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