Kouta: Poetic Forms

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the kouta, a Japanese quatrain (or 4-line) form.
Author:
Publish date:

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the kouta, a Japanese quatrain (or 4-line) form.

Image placeholder title

Kouta Poems

The only poetic mention of kouta I've found (online or in print) is in Robin Skelton's The Shapes of Our Singing, though I did find a post on Japan Info that claims it was a traditional song of geisha. Both sources also interpret the word kouta as meaning "little song." Skelton provides two variations of these little songs.

(Click here to check out other Japanese poetic forms.)

Kouta (Version 1): quatrain (or 4 lines) with the following syllable count per line: 7575

Kouta (Version 2): quatrain with the following syllable count: 7775

No other rules regarding rhymes, seasonal words, subject matter, etc.

*****

Build an Audience for Your Poetry!

Build an Audience for Your Poetry tutorial

While your focus as a poet will always be on refining your craft, why not cultivate a following along the way? With the multitude of social networking opportunities available today, it’s never been easier to connect with other poetry enthusiasts. Within minutes, you can set up a blog and share your poems and insights with like-minded readers.

Discover how to expand your readership and apply it to your poetry sharing goals today!

Click to continue.

*****

Here’s my attempt at a kouta:

Doe, by Robert Lee Brewer

She walked across dew-soaked grass
along with two fawns
but never looked as it passed
traffic in the dawn.

And here's the second variation:

Doe, by Robert Lee Brewer

She walked across dew-soaked grass
along with two spotted fawns
but never looked as it passed
traffic in the dawn.

Poetic Forms

Rannaigecht Mor Gairit: Poetic Forms

Poetic Form Fridays are made to share various poetic forms. This week, we look at the rannaigecht mor gairit, a variant form of the rannaigecht.

Weinstein_1:21

The Writer, The Inner Critic, & The Slacker

Author and writing professor Alexander Weinstein explains the three parts of a writer's psyche, how they can work against the writer, and how to utilize them for success.

Stottlemyre_1:21

Todd Stottlemyre: On Mixing and Bending Genres

Author Todd Stottlemyre explains how he combined fiction and nonfiction in his latest book and what it meant as a writer to share his personal experiences.

plot_twist_story_prompts_take_a_trip_robert_lee_brewer

Plot Twist Story Prompts: Take a Trip

Every good story needs a nice (or not so nice) turn or two to keep it interesting. This week, have a character take a trip somewhere.

Probst_1:20

Making the Switch from Romance to Women’s Fiction

In this article, author Jennifer Probst explains the differences between romance and women's fiction, the importance of both, and how you can make the genre switch.

Wrobel_1:20

Stephanie Wrobel: On Writing an Unusual Hero

Author Stephanie Wrobel explains how she came to write about mental illness and how it affects familial relationships, as well as getting inside the head of an unusual character.

who_are_the_inaugural_poets_for_united_states_presidents_robert_lee_brewer

Who Are the Inaugural Poets for United States Presidents?

Here is a list of the inaugural poets for United States Presidential Inauguration Days from Robert Frost to Amanda Gorman. This post also touches on who an inaugural poet is and which presidents have had them at their inaugurations.

precedent_vs_president_grammar_rules_robert_lee_brewer

Precedent vs. President (Grammar Rules)

Learn when to use precedent vs. president with Grammar Rules from the Writer's Digest editors, including a few examples of correct usages.

Poetry Prompt

Wednesday Poetry Prompts: 554

Every Wednesday, Robert Lee Brewer shares a prompt and an example poem to get things started on the Poetic Asides blog. This week, write a future poem.